American Masters Jimi Hendrix: Hear My Train a Comin'

2013

Biography / Documentary

198
IMDb Rating 7.7 10 324

Synopsis


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1.05 GB
1280*720
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
90 min
P/S N/A / N/A
2.16 GB
1920×1080
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
90 min
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Movie Reviews

Reviewed by st-shot 8 / 10 / 10

Fine Doc on Mozart of American Rock

Jimi Hendrix was the greatest single rock star of it's era and remains so today. No one before or since has come close to his status but not until this American Masters profile has anyone done such an in depth biography on this iconic rock star who died over forty years ago. A 73 profile was decent enough with plenty of rock footage but it lacked the key interviews that AM provides in a career that ended at bad luck rock number 27. In addition to rock icons there are family members and lovers to present a unique artist in full both simple and complex. It also has a much shyer off stage Hendrix explaining his craft. Last and by far most we have the artist on stage blowing away the audience. Having grown up in that era I had never heard a sound like his and from the response in the neighborhood, the country and among his peers (Clapton, Townsend, The Beatles etc.) the verdict was unanimous, he was a rock superstar that not only played guitar better and more outlandishly than anyone in the business but also had an outstanding blues/rock voice along with interpretive skills that made covers ( Hey Joe, All Along the Watchtower, Wild Thing) superior to the original as well as pen Blues masterpieces like Red House. The Jimi Hendrix experience for this teen if I may use the term was one awesome ride. So it is better late than never in the true sense that American Masters pays tribute to American rock's most iconic symbol in an era that might draw new fans away from the mediocrity to be found in the industry these days consisting of rhyming simpletons who can't play a note, pole dancers and manufactured pop stars selected by committee. I realize we can't pass down our idols but the way Hendrix transcends time he is one of the few rockers well worth a look back at.

Reviewed by classicsoncall / 10

"He was an entity unto himself." - Friend Linda Keith about Jimi Hendrix

As a long time fan and follower of Jimi Hendrix, I thought I knew pretty much everything I needed to know about the legendary guitarist, but this documentary contained so much information I wasn't aware of that it stands as the best Hendrix biopic I've seen yet. Better even than the 1973 documentary "Jimi Hendrix" made only three years after his untimely death. What adds fascinating detail and resonance to Jimi's life are the wide ranging interview clips of family members and fellow musicians who offered their personal takes on Jimi. For example, I've never seen his father Al Hendrix speak about his son before, nor daughter Janie or cousin Bob Hendrix. Their personal reflections are interspersed throughout the story along with those of contemporary artists like Dave Mason, Steve Winwood, Paul McCartney and Buddy Miles. The documentary presents a fine overview of most of Jimi's life, beginning with his youth spent almost entirely without the presence of his mother in the picture. At sixteen, Hendrix joined the Army and became a paratrooper, eventually receiving a medical discharge for a broken ankle following his twenty fifth jump from an airplane. These things I already knew, but was unaware that be became fast friends with musician Billy Cox while in the service, a relationship that would remain strong until his passing. Throughout the documentary, it's repeatedly stressed that from his early youth, Jimi never, ever appeared appeared anywhere without a guitar strapped over his shoulder and practicing his music incessantly whenever possible. Hendrix's musical career is chronicled with undeniable detail that's been missing from other media I've watched or read, beginning with his discovery by Chas Chandler upon an introduction by friend Linda Keith (who was going with Keith Richards at the time). It was Chandler's idea to bring him to London where Jimi's blend of blues, rock, pop and psychedelia would find a more appreciative audience than America was ready for in 1966. A couple of years playing the London scene, and Jimi was ready to make his renewed American debut at the Monterey Pop Festival in June of 1987. Of all the musicians and bands who were around in the mid to late Sixties, it seems like Jimi was the only one who performed at the big three events of the era - Monterey, Woodstock in August of 1969, and the Isle of Wight Festival in August,1970. I didn't know it until watching this show that the band performing behind Jimi at Woodstock was not the original Experience, Mitch Mitchell had left the group. The Woodstock unit was named 'Gypsy Sun and Rainbows' by Hendrix himself on stage at Woodstock and included Noel Redding and his old pal Billy Cox. Then the group morphed into 'Band of Gypsys', again with Cox and Buddy Miles coming on as drummer. The story proceeds to mention how Jimi built a million dollar New York City recording studio on 8th Street, taking the name of Electric Lady from a prior, highly successful album. Perhaps the most shocking point made in the documentary was a conversation mentioned by Hendrix friend Collette Harmon, who said that Jimi told her he didn't expect to live past the age of thirty, and that he was OK with it. He died not quite three weeks following his performance at the Isle of Wight Festival. Though the cause was not mentioned in this story, an autopsy revealed that Jimi aspirated on his own vomit and died of asphyxia while intoxicated with barbiturates. A sad end to the life of arguably the greatest musical instrumentalist of all time. Even today, almost fifty years after his passing, the name of Jimi Hendrix is spoken of in reverent tones regarding his musicianship and showmanship. With the likes of McCartney, Mick Jagger, Keith Richards and Steve Winwood still performing, it's not inconceivable that had he lived, Hendrix would still be playing today in all his colorful glory.

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