And Now the Screaming Starts!

1973

Horror

40
IMDb Rating 6 10 1,742

Synopsis


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May 12, 2020

Director

Cast

Herbert Lom as Professor Van Helsing
Ian Ogilvy as Charles Fengriffen
Patrick Magee as Dr. Whittle
Peter Cushing as Utterson
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
834.86 MB
1280*720
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
91 min
P/S N/A / N/A
1.51 GB
1920×1080
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
91 min
P/S N/A / N/A

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by ma-cortes 6 / 10 / 10

Enjoyable terror film from Amicus factory with a sensational Peter Cushing

This eerie film is developed in an ancient and isolated castle and it takes place in 1795. . A just married couple goes home their grandparents during wedding night . As young Catherine just married Charles Fengriffen and moves into his castle . She becomes victim of an old curse that lays on the family . On her wedding night she's raped by a ghost and gets pregnant . The fiancé Charles Fengriffen (Ian Ogilvy) and his fiancée (Stephanie Beacham) aren't aware about the curse by terrible events occurred in past times and mysterious deeds are actually happening . In 1795 Silas , a young man who worked in stables attempts to avoid the violation of his young wife by the noble Fengriffen (Herbert Lom , he is second-billed as one of the main stars , though only appears in an extended flashback sequence). During the taking off between the noble landowner and the flunky is severed the hand of Silas . One time dead the noble , the vengeful spirit returns the castle , the revenge will be with the successors of tyrant Fengriffin . The severed hand goes back to torment the young couple , they are caught up by an ominous ghost and become inextricably involved in weird killings with several corpses . They will confront the mysterious evil force and legacy of horror of the Frengriffen family . Then the great Peter Cushing shows up to investigate at whatever risk . This Amicus production (Max Rosenberg and Milton Subotsky) is a good terror film with malevolent spectres and family curses and with amazing final surprise . The movie is plenty of grisly murders , tension , terror , genuine screaming , horrible chills and a little bit of blood and gore . The picture packs a creepy atmosphere and strange color by the fine cinematographer Dennis Cop . The casting is frankly well , there appears various awesome British actors , the always excellent Peter Cushing , Patrick McGee , Guy Rolfe and the habitual villain Herbert Lom who does not appear at all until the last quarter of the film . The tale was rightly directed by Roy War Baker who realized magnificent terror films (Quatermass and the pit) . Motion picture will appeal to British horror enthusiasts .

Reviewed by simon-118 7 / 10 / 10

Curious neglected tale which is about as nasty as the Hammer stylemovies got.

Odd film, this. Not being the biggest fan of Hammer, I always felt Amicus a more competent stable (neither really produced a film that was actually frightening, but they could be entertaining, and Amicus were glossy and lurid.) This one is a little-known piece that always gets bad reviews but I happen to like it. Firstly, it has a splendid cast. Secondly, the camerawork is something to behold, the sickly lurid colours blending in with the gorgeous period costumes and attractive, dramatic locations. There is also a little more going on here than meets the eye. Perhaps a subtle nod to the Glamis Castle story...? There's a little bit of class war going on, and despite its vivid rape scene I can't help feeling this isn't quite the exploitation movie it appears. For an early 70s movie it does at least treat the issue seriously; the effect it has on the victim and the fact that no measures can atone for it are believable. A word to the excellent music, beautiful but interspersed with a spooky zither. And Geoffrey Whitehead is very good. The graveyard climax is pretty powerful too, and the closing shot as a camera wanders an empty room to the Bible is a cut above what one expects from this genre. The bad points are the tacky severed hand, the occasional Grand Guignol hamminess and the fact that the film does rather overplay it's hand...it spends so long building up to its revelation that by then it will always be a let down. And one other criticism...Catherine recovers from her wedding night ordeal ridiculously quickly, which totally contradicts the film's central premise. Still, the open window symbolism and the Malleus Mallificarum references are neat, as is the wonderful scene of Charles standing by the window as the snow falls and reading the lines from Milton's Comus. This film honestly isn't as bad as you may think and you could certainly do alot worse on a dark winter evening!

Reviewed by JamesHitchcock 7 / 10 / 10

To Be Seen Late at Night

There was something of a vogue for horror films in Britain during the sixties and early seventies, probably because there was a market for material of this nature but censorship meant that it could not be shown on television. Hammer were the best-known film production company of the British horror boom, but they had a number of rivals, and this film was made by one of these, Amicus Productions. Amicus were best known for "portmanteau" films like "Tales from the Crypt", generally with a contemporary rather than a period setting, which meant lower production costs. "And Now the Screaming Starts!" is one of their few attempts to invade the Hammer territory of a single feature-length story set in the past. It even features one of Hammer's best-known stars, Peter Cushing. Despite the rather jokey title, complete with exclamation mark, this is not a horror spoof along the lines of "Carry On Screaming". Nor, despite the presence of Cushing in the cast, is it a Transylvanian tale of vampires and werewolves. It is rather a Gothic ghost story reminiscent of the work of M R James, although more sexually explicit than anything James would have been allowed to write. The action takes place in the year 1795. A young married couple, Charles and Catherine Fengriffen, move into the stately home of the Fengriffen family. At first the marriage seems a happy one, but soon Catherine is troubled by strange dreams and visions, all of which seem to be connected with Silas, the mysterious and sinister woodcutter who lives in a cottage on the estate, and a portrait of Charles's grandfather, Sir Henry. She comes to believe that the house is haunted and that there is a curse on the Fengriffen family. Several people who try to help her meet mysterious deaths. Eventually Charles admits to Catherine, who is by now pregnant, that there is a legend of a family curse, connected to a terrible crime committed by Sir Henry. Despite his being the most established star among the cast, Cushing's part is a relatively small one; he plays a doctor brought in to try and cure Catherine of what her husband believes is a mental illness and fulfils that common role in horror films, the rationalist sceptic whose scepticism is inevitably proved wrong by events. Cushing is, however, very good in his role, and there is also a good performance from Herbert Lom as the cruel and debauched Henry, whose crime is seen in flashback. Stephanie Beacham was previously best known to me as Sable in that "Dynasty" spin-of "The Colbys", but here we get to see just how strikingly beautiful she was as a young woman. Some of the productions of the British horror cycle could be awful, and Cushing, although a talented actor, often found himself cast in the worst of them. ("The Blood Beast Terror" from 1967 and "The Satanic Rites of Dracula", also from 1973, are two particularly dire examples). "And Now the Screaming Starts!", however, is one of the better ones. Its plot may be far-fetched, but all films in this particular genre require a large amount of suspension of disbelief on the part of the viewer, and director Roy Ward Baker, who in the latter part of his career tended to specialise in horror, is able at times to conjure up a quite genuine sense of terror. Moreover, some of the most powerful scenes are those seen in flashback, and here no suspension of disbelief is needed. Ghosts may or may not exist; men as depraved as Sir Henry undoubtedly do, which from my point of view makes them far more frightening than any ghost. This is a highly watchable film, especially when seen late at night. 7/10 A goof. The Fengriffen mansion is built in the Victorian Gothic style, quite anachronistic for a film set in the late 18th century. The actual house used, Oakley Court in Berkshire, was in fact not built until 1859. The film-makers, however, clearly felt that Gothic architecture was much more in keeping with the mood of a horror film than Georgian classicism would have been.

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