Batman: The Movie

1966

Adventure / Comedy / Crime / Family

55
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 78%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 62%
IMDb Rating 6.5 10 29,183

Synopsis


Downloaded times
October 12, 2020

Cast

Adam West as Batman / Bruce Wayne
Burgess Meredith as The Penguin
Cesar Romero as The Joker
Lee Meriwether as The Catwoman / Kitka
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
964.79 MB
1280*720
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
105 min
P/S N/A / N/A
1.94 GB
1920×1080
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
105 min
P/S N/A / N/A

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by phillindholm 8 / 10 / 10

''Sometimes you just can't get rid of a bomb!''

1966 was, among many other things, the year of "Batman". This campy color TV series (very) loosely based on the classic comic strip, was originally planned for a fall debut. But the ABC network which commissioned the show, had already seen several of their new programs fail dismally in the ratings. Desperate for some promising new material. they gave "Batman" the green light, and it premiered in January. Thanks to it's 'hip' humor, an eye-popping kaleidoscope of bizarre color backgrounds and a cast of "guest villains" second to none: Julie Newmar, Cesar Romero, Anne Baxter, Burgess Meredith (the list goes on and on) the show was an immediate smash. Suddenly, America became "batty" and it's popularity was so great that stars scrambled for a chance to appear on the program. Along with its ratings, success came the brilliant merchandising campaign - everything from bubble gum cards and records to underwear and cereal. Inevitably, a movie was planned, supposedly either to introduce audiences to the show (which wasn't necessary after all, because the program was picked up first) or to sell the series overseas. It's main function, of course, was to cash in on the Batmania flooding the country while it was still hot. So, with a slightly bigger budget - mainly to accommodate the construction of the batboat and the batcopter, a feature version of the show was quickly filmed between the end of the first season and the beginning of the second. By the time of the movie's release in August 1966, however, the Batman craze had already begun to fade. The critics, for the most part, dismissed the film and audiences chose to ignore it. And, in recent years, there has been some speculation as to what happened. Although it has been written that Twentieth Century-Fox did little to inform the public that this was a project made exclusively for the big screen and not (as with "The Man from Uncle") a compilation of previously seen television episodes edited into a feature. In fact, the movie was promoted both in advertising materials (trailers, posters, etc) and magazine features as being "All New, Made Especially for the Giant Motion Picture Screen". It appears that the viewing public felt that it was probably just more of the same, figuring there was no point in paying to see what they got for free at home. So, despite mass bookings in every theater available, the film came and went. But, seen today, "Batman" holds up well, capturing perfectly what was one of the biggest fads to come along in the sixties. Adam West and Burt Ward personify the clueless but virtuous Superheroes - always ready for a challenge, and, as usual, lionized by their puny police force led by Commissioner Gordon (Neil Hamilton) and Chief O'Hara (Stafford Repp). Alfred, alter-ego Bruce Wayne's faithful butler (Alan Napier) and Harriet Cooper (Madge Blake), aunt of Robin's alter ego Dick Grayson are on hand as well. The chief delight here though, are the four Supervillains - The Catwoman (Lee Meriwether, subbing for Julie Newmar), The Penguin (a rakish Burgess Meredith), The Joker (onetime Latin lover Cesar Romero) and The Riddler (a manic Frank Gorshin). The plot, the usual nonsense involving this crew's attempt at world domination, serves as a suitable background for sight gags and pratfalls galore. Meriwether and Meredith are the Villains with the most footage, each getting to disguise themselves during the course of the story. Posing as Russian reporter Miss Kitka, and sporting a commendably convincing accent, the incredibly lovely Meriwether is (understandably) successful in a scheme to lure Bruce Wayne into a kidnapping, hoping Batman will dash to the rescue! Meredith is not quite as able, in his guise as the villain's hostage Commodore Schmidlapp, though he does manage to get into the secret Batcave. And the plot thickens...West and Ward perform their chores with appropriately deadpan dispatch, but, as usual, the devils have the best parts, with Lee Meriwether offering a deliciously different interpretation of The Catwoman, and Burgess Meredith, who was born to play The Penguin, standing out. Batman is great fun both for younger viewers (who won't pick up on the intentional parody) and older ones (who will). "Holy time capsule!" Sevaral years ago, a wide screen DVD was released. It boasts an excellent transfer, Stereo sound and many extras, including a running commentary track with West and Ward, trailers, still galleries, and new featurettes about the film, and the Batmobile, with creator George Barris. A MUST for Batfans!

Reviewed by The_Movie_Cat 7 / 10 / 10

"Oh, the delicious irony of it all!"

Having, losing, gaining... to a generation of kids this WAS Batman. Only when Tim Burton reinvented the big screen perception of the "caped crusader" did it become outdated. The third of the new films, Batman Forever parodied this film and the series with a "holy" joke. Unfortunately the movie in question was the first to be directed by Joel Schumacher, and so was consequently brash and bereft of wit. Yes, thanks to ShoeMaker this version of Gotham has suddenly become the coolest yet again. It's all such brilliant fun, awash with the irony so gloriously absent from Batman & Robin. Michael Keaton was a wonderfully dark Batman, but the other two were planks. Adam West is knowingly hammy as the title role, and relishes the deliberately cheesy lines. He has a potbelly and a costume that looks like it was made out of an old binliner. Anyone who cannot see the genius of that is beyond help. Burt Ward's brilliantly overacted Robin is also hilarious, and far less irritating than the asinine Chris O'Donnell version. The Batmobile is ace, too. I remember having a chunky Corgi model of the car that shot out matchsticks across the room. Much better than a CGI-enhanced penile extension. Even the rubbish filmed backdrops are fun. Everything's a bat-something in this film, a rope ladder having a large "Bat Ladder" sign tied to the end. This is a fantastic movie, how could anyone not love it? Some hilarious scenes include the shark fight, the trap door spring and Batman with the biggest (and longest-fused) bomb in history. Look at this dialogue exchange where they try to work out which supervillain is behind the mayhem: "But wait! It happened at sea. See? C for Catwoman." "An exploding shark ... was pulling my leg." "The Joker! It all led to a sinister riddle. Riddle -er. Riddler?" Fortunately, it turns out they're all involved, along with Burgess Meredith as the Penguin. The scenes set on the villains' hideout are shot with the camera at slanted angles, an inspired touch. All the poor things about this film work in its favour - Cesar Romero as the Joker looks about 80 and clearly hasn't bothered to shave off his moustache, but it works, as does the full-bore "acting" of Meredith and Merriwether. Only Frank Gorshin as the Riddler slightly disappoints; though that's because he's nowhere near as over the top. He is, of course, infinitely preferable to Jim Carrey. Anyway, they all work superbly together and the film doesn't feel top-heavy. A huge flaw of the new series, where more than one villain never quite clicked, can you imagine Nicholson, Pfeiffer, Carrey and DeVito all in the same movie? Of course it'd be impossible not just in budget but in egos, so having modest TV actors here serves the story well. One strange element of characterisation is seeing the Joker getting bossed around by the Penguin, something that would never happen in the comics. Some of it's so wilfully silly it almost goes too far. If you put your tongue into your cheek you may choke, and seeing a Pentagon head playing tiddlywinks eggs the joke a little, though the whole thing is so well-meaning that you simply can't hold it against the movie. The plot, though, really isn't up to much at all, something I never noticed as a child (but then I never realised it was a comedy when I was a child, either). A repetitious sequence of events that sees the villains constantly trying to destroy Batman and Robin from afar, the heroes trying to locate their secret base. It goes round in circles, but a glorious "Biff! Pow!" fight on a submarine and a sideways swipe at eugenics make sure it all ends in style. Lastly, look out for the scene where Ward and West run up and down on the spot ("Luckily we're in tip-top condition!") while a film background of a street and the theme tune play - a classic. Simple, silly fun and almost relentlessly appealing. So much so I nearly added another point to the total... 6/10.

Reviewed by counterrevolutionary 7 / 10 / 10

POW! BIFF! THWACK!

Tim Burton's BATMAN is for people who take comic books seriously. The Adam West BATMAN TV series and movie is for the rest of us. Batman is the role West was born to play. He delivers his lines with a seriousness and self-importance perhaps matched only by Steven Seagal--and Seagal isn't trying to be funny. I can understand how comic-book fans might dislike this movie. It does, after all, treat the whole Batman concept with jokey disrespect (though really, as another reviewer pointed out, it's an over-the-top parody of the old serials). However, for those of us who see the inherent silliness in the notion of a "millionaire playboy" dressing up in a bat suit to fight "supervillains," it's fun to watch a movie that sees it as well. Perhaps the most amusing aspect of this movie is its off-the-wall view of the United Nations; the particular ambassadors are treated as something more than bureaucrats, apparatchiks, and political cronies who could be replaced in five minutes with any of ten thousand equally capable (or incapable) people. 7/10.

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