Bloom

2003

Drama / Romance

56
IMDb Rating 5.5 10 306

Synopsis


Downloaded times
November 11, 2020

Director

Cast

Hugh O'Conor as Stephen Dedalus
Patrick Bergin as The citizen
Paul Ronan as Lenehan
Stephen Rea as Leopold Bloom
720p.WEB 1080p.WEB
997.11 MB
1280*720
English 2.0
R
23.976 fps
113 min
P/S N/A / N/A
1.81 GB
1920×1080
English 2.0
R
23.976 fps
113 min
P/S N/A / N/A

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by bongo-6 10 / 10 / 10

We are very lucky that a director like Sean Walsh came along when he did and made such a beautiful film.

When you go to see a movie it helps if you know a little bit about the subject. For example if you see a James Bond film it helps if you know that he is British and against the Russians – or whatever. It's the same with this film – it helps if you know about James Joyce and helps even more if you know about Ulysses which the movie has been adapted from. The book has many themes and it's a book where the words are very important – not the plot; so the director has made the words important to this movie. One of the most famous passages in Ulysses is Molly Bloom's Penelope soliloquy at the end of the book. It starts on page 659 and ends on page 704 – it is one long stream of consciousness sentence with no punctuation and only gaps for paragraphs; it takes in many images and history of the characters. In this film the director, Sean Walsh, starts with this soliloquy and during it he cuts to various memories of her loving 'Poldy' – Leopold Bloom - in good times and to her sexual exploits with the current beau Blazes Boylan. This works very well and the music, 'Love's Old Sweet Song,' matches underneath the soliloquy perfectly. Ulysses, apart from being written in many styles of other writers of the time, has parts which are dedicated to the human body, parts which are dedicated to colours and parts which are dedicated to music and one of the most memorable pieces of music, which goes with the stunning cinematography by Ciarán Tanham, is the aforementioned 'Love's Old Sweet Song'; this music sets the mood for the whole film. The soliloquy is used throughout the film as a counter commentary to the innermost thoughts of her husband, Bloom. He knows what she is doing back at their house in Eccles Street with Blazes Boylan, who is supposed to be there to arrange a concert tour, so he stays out of the way and goes on his famous wander around Dublin with the text being spoken in voice over as he observes his day, on June 16th 1904, as it has been his day, Bloomsday, ever since. Ulysses is what you might describe as an epic novel. Other adaptations of epic novels, such as East of Eden, concentrate on a certain section of the book. This film doesn't do that. There will be those who might think this film tries to do too much but I don't think so; I think it does enough. It gives you a smattering of what Ulysses is about and if you have never read it this film will give you a good start; a kind of Cliff's Notes on film. I first heard Stephen Rea play Stephen Dedalus on BBC radio and here he is coming full circle and playing Bloom. A little less rotund than one has imagined Bloom to be but perfectly cast nonetheless and very intelligently played - as is Molly Bloom by the voluptuous Angeline Ball – hasn't she come on since her debut in 'The Commitments' and why don't we see more of her? Usually it's very hard to get anything by James Joyce produced as the rights to his works are owned by his grandson Stephen. But I believe this film was started when James Joyce's works were in public domain before the law changed. We are very lucky that a director like Sean Walsh came along when he did and made such a beautiful film. I think he was governed by the budget in a good way as I dread to think what a Hollywood Studio would have done with a massive budget. As I mentioned this took place on June 16th 1904 and on that day the winner of the gold cup was a horse called 'Throwaway' and when Bloom inadvertently tips the winner we can see that the jockey on the horse is a certain Mr Sean Walsh. The reason why this story is set on June 16th 1904 is because that was the day James Joyce first walked out with his beloved Nora Barnacle. As Sean Walsh took a little licence over the end credits with Bloom wandering around modern Dublin might it have been more fitting as this was a film to have a glimpse of James Joyce and Nora walking together on that fateful day?

Reviewed by kristenrobertson 3 / 10 / 10

R-U-B-B-I-S-H

Bloomsday 100 should have yielded a fitting tribute to Ireland's great James Joyce. Unfortunately, this was not to be. I was insulted by this movie on so many levels. First and foremost, this film had the potential to blow audiences away. With material as rich as Ulysses, the filmmakers had a unique opportunity to bring a novel that has a reputation for being difficult to a whole new audience. What they achieved instead was a pedestrian annotation of a few of the novel's plot points. Additionally, the acting was stilted (especially the part of Stephen Dedalus), the lighting was abhorrent, the art direction lacking and the shot selection shoddy. With a veritable army of Joyce scholars spread across the globe, one would think SOMEONE would have been consulted about important themes, artistic interpretation, and the smorgasbord of visual, musical, literary and historical references in Joyce's text. And the music - absolutely insulting. Joyce included literally hundreds of references to music in Ulysses. All those fabulous resources were abandoned in favour of the singsong simplicity of the original score. Digital features can be done so well these days and independent film-making, especially with the rich textually of Ulysses behind this production, should have freed the filmmakers to follow in the revolutionary spirit of Ireland's great epic. Instead, they produced hardly the epic film the book deserved, but something akin to a first year student film. Farcical. However, this production does leave the door wide open for an artistic visionary to tackle the book properly and produce a film worthy of the monumental Leopold Bloom.

Reviewed by lynchboy2001 3 / 10 / 10

Oh what could have been...

Bloom (or Bl.,m if you're to go by the opening credits) had the potential to follow in the footsteps of what is regarded as the greatest written novel of the 20th century, the Joyce classic Ulysses, an epic ramble around Dublin. What we have here though is merely a supplement to the novel, an illustrated guide to the main parts of the book. Anyone wishing to enjoy this purely as a cinematic event will be disappointed, as the film seems to be almost completely inaccessible to someone not versed in the book. The major plot points (and there are numerous) are lightly touched on (eg Bloom's 'Jewishness') and then we get a plethora of narration taken verbatum from the book over scene after scene on beaches! Obviously the size of the budget limited this film greatly, but it seems the one crucial element missing from the book was the actual walking itself. Since the book focuses on the main characters walking around Dublin, you would expect some in the film, but given the changing face of Dublin 100 years in the future, the film was severely restricted, much to it's detriment. The film had potential yes, but perhaps too much was bitten off, & the pretentious ending, coupled with manipulative a score ruins even the ideas trying to be expressed by this too-faithful adaptation.

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