Bringing Out the Dead

1999

Drama / Thriller

121
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 71%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 70%
IMDb Rating 6.8 10 61,053

Synopsis


Downloaded times
May 28, 2020

Cast

John Goodman as Oklahoma Cop
Martin Scorsese as Vincent Van Gogh
Nicolas Cage as Acid Yellow
720p.WEB 1080p.WEB
1.09 GB
1280*720
English 2.0
R
23.976 fps
121 min
P/S N/A / N/A
2.23 GB
1920×1080
English 2.0
R
23.976 fps
121 min
P/S N/A / N/A

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by MrVibrating 8 / 10 / 10

Surreal, strange, special and very, very good

This surreal portrayal of a stressed-out depressed, alcoholic and generally weird paramedic is a movie you cannot watch just like that. I recommend watching it late at night, but not too tired, since you have to be quite alert to catch everything that's going on. The basic plot is about an ambulance driver(Nicolas Cage can act!) who hasn't saved anyone for months and begins to doubt he can save anyone anymore. He drinks booze and coffee and the result is a great mess. This is not a "beginning to the end" kind of movie. When the movie ends, nothing is really solved. The acting is pretty much flawless. Nicolas Cage does his best performance to date, and his paramedic buddies and the people he encounters are all very well portrayed. John Goodman is a fat, sweaty but somewhat likable paramedic, Tom Sizemore(!) is a psychotic ambulance driver who has his very own view of the job, Ving Rhames is a delivered Christian who takes the job as an opportunity to save souls, Mark Anthony is an interesting street weirdo, and Patricia Arquette is a weary woman who loses her father. The imagery is very good too. New York whizzes past, full of lights and darkness. It's gritty, it's moody and it's surreal. If you can stand a little unorthodox cinema then you'll like Bringing Out the Dead. But be sure to be in the mood, or the experience will be very different. Oh, and I salute all the paramedics and other health care heroes out there. If your job is anywhere near this movies, you're the greatest.

Reviewed by JRoberts 10 / 10 / 10

A brilliant film

Bringing out the Dead, unfortunately, has fewer fans than it deserves. Why? Because this isn't simply a "New York" movie, or a movie about a paramedic, or about euthenasia, despite the ostensible setting and plot points. Instead, Scorsese has created a cinematic myth about how haunted modern existence can be, and what it takes to be "saved" and find grace in a seemingly godless world. His vision of New York is all literate existential comedy, not a window into the rotten Big Apple. Mere satiric commentary on the tragedy of life in New York is for journeyman directors; Scorsese is doing something else entirely here. In other words, this is that really rare beast--a literate film that is, first and foremost, still a great movie. In the plot and its implications, there's more here of Flannery O Conner or Virginia Woolf than there is here of, say, Tom Wolf. More pariticularly, Bringing out the Dead does with masterful filmmaking what Joyce's The Dead did in prose. This film is a truly eye-opening investigation into how the living exist in the shadow of the dead and dying. The film accomplishes this incredibly difficult task on many levels--the cinematography alone should give you a clue that this is definitely not Taxi Driver or Goodfellas--there's something more sublime here (the beauty that American Beauty explains wonderfully is shown everywhere in this film, but Bringing out the Dead is less mundane, simple and "character" oriented). Every shot is right, and the numerous computer effects here--on display almost for their own sake in The Matrix--are here poetically put together by a master director. So, just for it's approach to a subject that few movies or directors would even attempt, this film will be a classic. Oddly enough, one of the few movies it can be compared with is Hitchcock's Vertigo, which confronts the same issues in a different way. Scotty's (Jimmy Stewart) desire to "raise" the dead is as strong as Frank's, and audiences didn't much like Vertigo when it was released either. The acting, the music, the incredible photography--they're all great, if you realize you are watching a literate, funny, well-plotted (as opposed to simply plotted) meditation on the ghosts that increasingly inhabit our technocratic dwellings. Too good for a grade: see it on the biggest, best screen you can while you can. BTW--it's better the second time.

Reviewed by dmwaves2000 10 / 10 / 10

Excellent movie

As an emergency physician and film buff, this film is one of my favorites. Martin Scorcese utilized excellent film technique with his inventive camera shots integrated with a dark comedic plot (check out the triage nurse) to create a bright modern cinema masterpiece with rich characters, comedic irony, and a sense of perseverance against overwhelming angst and the dark underbelly of modern urban life. This film is a classic on a par with Harold and Maude, and the King of Hearts. Three thumbs up- (I'm dysmorphic)... In any case, this movie deserves to be watched by anyone involved in healthcare and anyone involved in EMS activities.

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