Bye Bye Birdie

1963

Comedy / Musical

135
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 89%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 66%
IMDb Rating 6.6 10 7,369

Synopsis


Downloaded times
September 26, 2020

Director

Cast

Ann-Margret as Kim McAfee
Dick Van Dyke as Albert F. Peterson
Janet Leigh as Rosie DeLeon
Kim Darby as Teenager
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
1 GB
1280*720
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
112 min
P/S N/A / N/A
2.06 GB
1920×1080
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
112 min
P/S N/A / N/A

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by movibuf1962 7 / 10 / 10

A Lot of Livin' to do.

With the gift of a DVD by a good friend, I have now viewed BBB for the first time in over 20 years. And the comments here astound me: so many people coming to a message board to complain on a film that isn't a stage show. Or a book. Or an editorial. Different media sometimes (not always, to be sure) necessitate a change or alteration in a story adaptation. Yes, Rosie's ethnicity is down pedaled in the film (mainly because Chita Riviera wasn't in it), but they don't eliminate it entirely by the inclusion of a hideous black wig on Janet Leigh. I didn't miss Albert not being an English teacher as opposed to a chemist at all; it doesn't change the essence of his still-henpecked-by-his-mother character. On a different matter, I'm a little surprised to learn that Dick Van Dyke apparently had a bruised ego because of the strong emergence of co-star Ann-Margret in the film (his name still comes before hers, f'heaven's sakes!), but what can you do? The film is a fun, bright, pseudo-satire of the generation gap, teens, Elvis, and most of all, Ed Sullivan!! The finer numbers include the A-M introduction in "How Lovely to be a Woman" followed by the insane ensemble piece "Sincere-" which contains one of the funniest closing camera pans ever used in a film. "Kids" is also fine, but "Put on a Happy Face" is hampered by the limited dancing ability of Janet Leigh- through no fault of her own, mind you, but an obvious hole in what should have been a boy-girl dance duet (which they try to hide with excessive trick camera effects). The film's standout number, IMO, is "A Lot of Livin' to Do-" a nightclub extravaganza sung by THREE different leads advancing two different plots of the story at once. With stellar direction by George Sidney and inventive choreography by Onna White, it first appears as a conventional girl-swooning solo for the title character, but quickly shifts to the cat-and-mouse antics of torn lovers A-M and Bobby Rydell, who lead the entire club in a kind of challenge dance. And while it isn't her first film, this is the scene (for me, anyway) which shows A-M's breakout performance, dancing in a bare midriff and pair of hot-pink capris- and she blows the roof off the place. No surprise that the next year she was cast opposite Elvis himself. Check it out, and try not to break into dance yourself, I dare you!!

Reviewed by t_k_matthews 7 / 10 / 10

Single best reason to watch

It's not the amiable performance of Dick Van Dyke, emerging as a star. It's not the fresh-from-the-shower Janet Leigh as Rosie. It's not the pretty good Broadway score. It's not the always-funny Paul Lynde, leering and lavender, an unlikely mouthpiece for the eternal frustrations of fatherhood. (Kids! I don't know what's wrong with these kids today!) It's certainly not the hokey and unconvincing and undangerous Elvis/Conway Twitty rock'n'roller who looks like he just came from a gig at the used car lot. And it's not the silly subplots involving Russians and amphetamines and Ed Sullivan (although nice to see the wooden, totemic variety show host reanimated again.) It is, of course, Ann-Margaret, impossibly young and beautiful. But let's be more specific. It is not her sinfully delicious performance generally. It is this: Ann-Margaret, alone before a backdrop, singing the theme at the very beginning and end of the movie. It is Ann Margaret fired up with sensual energy and burning through a song that is not inherently sexy. Oh, Lord: righteous. I was 13. I saw the movie, but *experienced* Ann-Margaret's opening and closing. I've never recovered.

Reviewed by bkoganbing 7 / 10 / 10

Spreading Sunshine All Over The Place

Bye Bye Birdie which ran a most respectable 607 performances on Broadway was the second musical by the team of Charles Strouse and Lee Adams. And though they've been responsible for such additional Broadway hits as Applause, Golden Boy, All American, not one other of their shows has ever been adapted to the screen. Though Bye Bye Birdie contains a number of hit songs still performed frequently today, it's never been revived. Interesting in that Grease which was a satire of that pre-Beatles era of rock and roll is performed all the time. You'd think the real article would occasionally be revived. The only ones who make the transition from Broadway to Hollywood from the cast are Dick Van Dyke and Paul Lynde. Probably because respectively they are so identified with the songs Put On A Happy Face and Kids that no one would see the film if they weren't in it. Based on the great pop culture uproar when Elvis Presley got drafted, Bye Bye Birdie is about a contest thought up by production assistant Janet Leigh to the Ed Sullivan Show to help her struggling songwriter boyfriend Dick Van Dyke. He writes a song One Last Kiss and Janet puts the idea to Sullivan to have Conrad Birdie {Jesse Pearson) sing it on the show to a special Conrad Birdie fan selected at random and bestow one last kiss before Uncle Sam takes him. The lucky girl is Ann-Margret of Sweet Apple, Ohio and wouldn't you know that she'd come from a town like that. The teen virgin roles Sandra Dee didn't get are the ones Ann-Margret got and unlike Dee, that girl could sing and dance. Her boyfriend is Bobby Rydell who was at the height of his teen idol popularity as well and they do make an attractive and charming couple. The dynamic of the triangle of Birdie, boyfriend, and fan is a very big change from the Broadway show. Realize that Bobby Rydell's part was played on Broadway by Michael J. Pollard and you KNOW it has to be different. Rydell, Pearson, and Ann-Margret sing and dance A Lot of Living To Do. Janet Leigh is not thought of as a musical performer, but she did acquit herself well, though she would never have classified herself in Chita Rivera's echelon as a dancer. Leigh was in Howard Hughes's earlier attempt at RKO for a big musical in Two Tickets to Broadway and she did well there as she does here. To say Bye Bye Birdie is from a more innocent time is to belabor the obvious. But if Grease can be continually revived, why can't Bye Bye Birdie?

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