Countdown

1967

Sci-Fi / Thriller

171
IMDb Rating 5.9 10 1,867

Synopsis


Downloaded times
August 4, 2020

Director

Cast

James Caan as Lee Stegler
Robert Duvall as Edwin Stewart
Ted Knight as Walter Larson
William Conrad as TV Newscaster
720p.WEB 1080p.WEB
930.32 MB
1280*720
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
101 min
P/S N/A / N/A
1.69 GB
1920×1080
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
101 min
P/S N/A / N/A

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by Scarecrow-88 8 / 10 / 10

Countdown

A geologist(James Caan)working for NASA gets the opportunity of a lifetime. Since US government will not allow perhaps a better candidate(Robert Duvall), an "air-force guy", to pilot the PILGRIM capsule to the moon, a civilian is needed and Caan is their boy. It's all about beating the Russians to the moon and first-time feature film director Robert Altman takes the helm fashioning it into a matter-of-fact documentary type deal where we see how everything takes place prior to launch. The media swarm, the rivalries(Duvall's Chiz is indeed screwed out of an opportunity), how the families cope, the spent time before that fateful trip, the planning, the testing, the debating on who should be piloting the capsule..everything is shown to us so that we get a clear picture of what it is like in not only the pilot's life, but also those that worry about the mission themselves. I must say this film is exceptionally well made, with an intelligent approach which tries to explain to us the hullabaloo that surfaces at such a historic event and how that effects Caan and his family along the way. It all comes down to that trip, though, that really provides some suspense. It's a curio piece also considering it features Duvall and Caan in the early stages of their careers as well as seeing the beginning of Altman's reign as an unusual artist with his camera placements and how the characters speak to one another(there is some moments where people talk over each other during discussions mainly in the sequences where Caan is in the capsule nearing the orbit of the moon).

Reviewed by runamokprods 6 / 10 / 10

A solid, if not personal, first feature for Altman

Mostly good, solid, well acted (especially by Robert Duvall and James Caan) story of behind the scenes politics among astronauts as we raced Russia towards the moon in the late 1960s. Gets a little soapy at times, some of the politics and science seem a little cheated, and key incidents are convenient and co-incidental. Production values, especially the special effects, are pretty weak. And Caan's astronaut is a little too open with his fears to be believed as a man of his position at that moment in history. On the other hand it's impressive that in 1969 someone made a space movie focusing on complex emotions and human behavior, not technology. The climax is a bit 'Hollywood', although at least a little more bittersweet than usual, if predictable (and a cheat). The small roles are well cast and played. Not really recognizably an Altman film, but certainly shows talent and is worth seeing.

Reviewed by evanston_dad 6 / 10 / 10

Altman's First Time at Bat

"Countdown," Robert Altman's first theatrical release, is the only film I've seen by the prolific director that feels nothing like an Altman project. A bit of history surrounding it reveals that Altman battled the studios over creative control, and that the final version of the film exists more as a product of the studio than of the auteur. Never again, for better or worse, would Altman relinquish control of his films, a tenacity that won him an instantly recognizable style not afforded to many other directors. So "Countdown" isn't terribly interesting formally and feels like it could have been directed by anybody, but that's not to say it isn't an interesting movie. Released a year before man actually landed on the moon, it provides a remarkably accurate guess at what such a feat would look like, and the film is played with conviction by a strong cast of actors led by James Caan, Robert Duvall and Michael Murphy. Duvall and Murphy would appear again in "MASH," and Murphy would go on to become an Altman regular. Barbara Baxley, known to Altman devotees as Haven Hamilton's wife in "Nashville," fulfills wifely duties in this film as well, though women may as well not even exist for all the attention the screenplay affords them. As a studio film, "Countdown" isn't half bad. As an Altman film, it's one of his weakest. But nevertheless, it's well worth seeking out, especially for fans of the iconoclastic director. Grade: B-

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