Curse of the Blood Ghouls

1964

Horror

119
IMDb Rating 5.2 10 303

Synopsis


Downloaded times
August 4, 2020

Director

Cast

720p.WEB 1080p.WEB
720.16 MB
1280*720
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
72 min
P/S N/A / N/A
1.31 GB
1920×1080
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
72 min
P/S N/A / N/A

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by goblinhairedguy 8 / 10 / 10

Full-Blooded Romanticism

Here's a "full-blooded", old-fashioned (some might say out-dated), baroque Italian vampire opus which deserves a better reputation than it's achieved. Although Hammer Studios merits credit for re-popularizing the moribund Gothic horror genre in the early 60s, the contemporaneous Latin (Italian, Spanish and Mexican) efforts usually evoke a more authentically Romantic and decadent atmosphere. This one features overwhelmingly ornate sets; voluptuous ingenues with inviting dark eyes and heaving bosoms; high-collared, flouncy-vested Don Juans; absurdly stilted dialogue; and a lush, intrusive score full of piano glissandos, piercing oboes, and even a theremin during the vampire seductions. The deliberate pacing serves to intensify the well-timed shocks, there are some clever camera set-ups, and fine shadowy photography (particularly during the dungeon-set climax). Fans of fast-paced, violent, revisionist horror will think it a dinosaur, but connoisseurs should find it greatly satisfying.

Reviewed by ferbs54 5 / 10 / 10

Fangs For The Mammaries

"The Slaughter of the Vampires" is an ambiguously titled (are the vampires doing the slaying here or being killed off themselves?) Italian horror outing from 1962. A fairly paint-by-numbers affair, though filmed in B&W, the film reunites stars Walter Brandi and Alfredo Rizzo from the earlier "Playgirls and the Vampire." Here, Brandi plays Wolfgang, a nobleman in an unnamed country whose new wife, Louise, played by the luscious Graziella Granata, is being preyed on by a vampire so generic that we never even learn his name; call him The Vampire. As portrayed by Dieter Eppler, this neck nosher is so very compelling that poor Louise gives in to his charms almost immediately, soon becoming a most, uh, toothsome vampiress herself. Good thing that Wolfgang has been given the address of a most van Helsing-like doctor in nearby Vienna.... Offering absolutely nothing new to the vampire mythos and no new spins on this hoary staple of the horror genre, "Slaughter" yet has enough pleasurable aspects to merit it a mild recommendation. For one, Eppler is pretty darn impressive as the undead seducer, and when he speaks, his words are like pure poetry. The film has been given some interesting directorial touches and camera angles by Roberto Mauri, actually does have atmosphere to spare, and builds to an exciting conclusion. Perhaps best of all, a piano-dominated, dreamy and evocative score has been provided by Aldo Piga that effectively brings an air of otherworldliness to the entire affair. The picture really isn't that bad; just completely unoriginal and wholly derivative. Anybody out there know the Italian expression for "been there, done that"?

Reviewed by MartinHafer 5 / 10 / 10

Not bad, just not at all original.

Although this movie sports the cool word "slaughter" in its title, this movie is very much the old Dracula story all over again (with only a minor twist at the end). While there are a few differences (such as the vampire looking pretty weird--a bit like a blond Liberace with raccoon eyes) as well as more cleavage than usual, the essence of the film is the same old same old--though the names have been changed. Although there is no one named Van Helsing or Nina Harker, the characters are still there but with different names. The biggest difference is that the entire first portion of the book and original movies is absent--and it begins later in the story. The only serious negatives are the silly music (which might have sounded better in a sci-fi flick) and the silly look of the vampire. Because the story is so similar and there isn't any new innovation to make it memorable, this is a story horror fans don't need to rush out to see, as the Bela Lugosi and Christopher Lee versions cover the same territory but do it much better. By the way, there were some complaints about the dubbing, though for a 1960s import, the quality isn't bad (except for the little girl--which sounds like an adult trying to sound like a girl). The voices seem appropriate and it wasn't a noticeable problem. Still, like many viewers, I would have preferred this to have been subtitled instead of dubbed into English.

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