Dark Intruder

1965

Horror / Mystery

125
IMDb Rating 6.5 10 269

Synopsis


Downloaded times
February 12, 2021

Director

Cast

Judi Meredith as Evelyn Lang
Leslie Nielsen as Brett Kingsford
Peter Mark Richman as Robert Vandenburg
Werner Klemperer as Professor Malaki
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
541.02 MB
1280*720
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
59 min
P/S N/A / N/A
1004.31 MB
1920×1080
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
59 min
P/S N/A / N/A

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by rwagn 6 / 10 / 10

Available on DVD-R

This title is now available via Sinister Cinema. The print is in great shape with just a few frame jumps scattered throughout the film. This pilot plays out like you would expect it to. The script is tight to keep the film to @60 minutes. It does have the feel and pacing of a television episode but is done well. The acting is good and the film is very atmospheric. I was surprised to see Leslie Nielson in the lead role. He has a rather evil looking dwarf for a manservant. I kept looking for Werner Klemperer as I noticed his name in the opening credits but must admit he got by me. I only found him by checking the acting/character names at the end of the film. He is in heavy makeup while on screen and even his voice is not recognizable. One negative note is the soundtrack composed by Lalo Shifrin. It contains some mighty cheesy organ playing and detached female vocalizing not unlike the original Star Trek theme! Catch this if you can. It's a neat little thriller and you could do a lot worse.

Reviewed by Bunuel1976 4 / 10 / 10

DARK INTRUDER (Harvey Hart, 1965) ***1/2

This was another last-minute inclusion in the ongoing Halloween Horror challenge, and one which also proved among the most rewarding viewings so far. I first knew of it from Leonard Maltin's *** capsule review in his esteemed "Film Guide", where the piece's TV origins ("Black Cloak" was actually the working title) and "one-of-a-kind" nature are mentioned. I was surprised to find it a period piece, but the end result still elicits a definite "Twilight Zone" feel – while anticipating, in concept and abrasive hero (ideally cast Leslie Nielsen and, who, incidentally, has a midget for valet/assistant!), the "Kolchak" series from the early 1970s. Despite the obvious low budget at the director's disposal, the film evokes a flawless Gothic atmosphere throughout. The fascinating plot involves a "House Of Wax"-type disfigured 'monster' – given an appropriately creepy make-up and played, of all people, by an unrecognizable Werner Klemperer of "Hogan's Heroes" fame! – causing havoc in fog-bound San Francisco (the attacks are quite vicious for a film of this kind), whose dual identity is gradually disclosed. There is, however, a method to his madness: a calling-card is left at the murder sites in the form of a mystical spoke-wheel; the period between each killing gets proportionally smaller; while the victims are eventually revealed to have been involved in his back-story. The level of suspense (and action) is considerable – especially in view of the film's very brief duration, a mere 59 minutes! – notably Nielsen's own numerous brushes with the monster (including one in which the hero spells out his suspicions to the Police Chief after yet another murder unaware that the villain is still present in the room with them!). The final twist, then, is the icing on the cake – with the tale having already reached a satisfactory conclusion, the script is seen to have one more ace up its sleeve. As can be expected, given the film's rarity, the print utilized could do with a restoration – but, really, this is no more than a minor quibble, when all the various components had come perfectly together to produce a classy (and memorable) show.

Reviewed by moonspinner55 4 / 10 / 10

Quickie Universal thriller originally meant for television...

Strapping bon vivant in gaslight San Francisco (played with self-amused assurance by Leslie Nielsen)--an apparent specialist in demonology--is called upon by the police commissioner to help with a serial killer case making headlines. It seems the cloaked strangler stalking the fog-enshrouded streets leaves behind a gargoyle head with his victims, causing the detective to think demonic possession may be involved. "Dark Intruder" (awful title!) isn't really an occult thriller at all; the explanation of the mystery (delivered in two parts!) is actually more outlandish or absurd than supernatural. Meant as a TV pilot (with a 59-minute running time), the movie is sloppily-directed, over-decorated and features numerous genre clichés (a brazen claw clasping a railing after our hero has walked passed, the shadow of the monster looming over a door, etc.). However, Nielsen is good, the sound effects are creepy, a fight scene at night is well-staged, and there's a decent (if familiar) visual at the end featuring an elaborate make-up effect. Charles Bolender (as Nielsen's impeccably-dressed little person manservant) is a terrific addition, but Judi Meredith's nervous bride-to-be is useless (and she sounds dubbed to boot). Not terrible, but really only for curious thriller-buffs. ** from ****

Read more IMDb reviews

0 Comments

Be the first to leave a comment