Eating Raoul

1982

Comedy / Crime

165
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 86%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 72%
IMDb Rating 6.8 10 6,998

Synopsis


Downloaded times
February 12, 2021

Director

Cast

Buck Henry as Mr. Leech
Ed Begley Jr. as Hippie
John Landis as Man who bumps into Mary at the bank
Robert Beltran as Raoul Mendoza
720p.BLU
768.09 MB
1280*720
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
90 min
P/S N/A / N/A

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by YAS 9 / 10 / 10

A heartwarmingly black comedy full of murders

This movie keeps ending up on my top ten list, no matter how many others come and go with the years. Director Paul Bartel began with a ridiculous premise, and then had everyone play it perfectly straight, which resulted in a comedy that doesn't telegraph its laughs. It's evident that the film was lovingly polished (again) in postproduction, down to the level of tiny incidental sound effects that add immeasurably to the hilarity if you happen to catch them. The story is full of murders, but there's no gore 'n guts here; it's all as discreet as an Agatha Christie novel, where Death is tastefully signaled by a thud from another room. EATING RAOUL is an excellent introduction to the topics of Los Angeles, food, swingers, and real estate loans, and resist as you may, you'll end up cheering for Paul and Mary as they work toward their dream of opening their very own restaurant.

Reviewed by alice liddell 9 / 10 / 10

Irony this PURE...

With filmmakers so cynical and despairing today about America, it's refreshing to see a film with so much faith in the American dream. This is a classic tale of rags to riches, of a respectable married couple, down on their financial luck, who, with initiative and a novel idea, manage to fulfil their dream, a hotel in the country. If, to get there, they must pose as bondage merchants, murder their clients, rob their wallets, give the bodies to a petty thief who sells them to dog-food companies as choice meat, than such is the nature of success. RAOUL declares itself as a true story from the Sodom and Gomorrhah of Hollywood, where fantastic wealth co-exists with degrading poverty. The film is a moral tale, about steering the middle-course, about what it takes to be normal and decent. It plays like straight John Waters, but just as hysterical, even if, eventually, it cannot sustain itself. The featured couple are called, appropriately, the Blands, and it is significant that their serial-killing weopon is a lethal frying-pan. Paul, played by the director, is the epitome of his name: balding, pedanctic, so obsessed with fine wines that he gets fired from his low-rent off-licence for over-ambition. His wife, Mary, is less bland, which is why she is more easily tempted by the dark side. While Paul remains sweetly virginal, she, a hospital nutritionist, works in an evnironment where she is continually harrassed by lecherous lotharios, and is knowledgeable enough to know that the most humiliating revenge is to have them receive their enema from a burly dandy. Bartel is a Roger Corman alumnus, and this can be seen in the fluid, economical filming, the functional set-ups that are actually quite complex. The film's very classical structure is at odds with (piecemeal) filming that has characters seem, ineptly, to wander up to the camera, although this has the unsettling effect of making the creepy nonsense seem curiously real. There is also a hint of suppressed Gothic in the telling - Mary's hysterical normality is so camp she could be Vampira - while the Blands' blandness is under attack from all sides. It's bad enough to have 'swingers' (a charmingly 50s word for perverts that chimes with the Blands' adorably tasteless 50s furniture left them by Mary's mother until she dies) crowding the tenement for sleazy, Warholian, sado-masochistic parties, but to have one of them storm into your apartment, throw up all over your carpet, nearly die in your lavatory, bring your husband to the party to be humiliated/initiated by Doris the Dominatrix, and then come back to violate your wife, is an imposition. The film makes satirical points enough - the rich and professional classes are all vile, violent sleazes, while the S&M 'sickos' are sweet, loving mothers who live in pleasant suburban avenues so indifferent to capitalist Darwinism that they help out the competition. The racism needed to keep normality normal is shown in the horrifyingly hilarious shooting of a store-robber, or in the final fate of self-confessed 'Chicano' Raoul, which suggest Peter Greenaway might be a fan of the film. The cannibalism theme has a long satirical history in jibes on the bourgeoisie, and it's no surprise to learn that Bartel is a devotee of Bunuel. But the film's real satire is to show how normality must survive in a society, Hollywood, that has obliterated any recognised sense of reality.

Reviewed by Schafe-2 9 / 10 / 10

I Guess I Was Just In The Mood!!

BEWARE! SPOILERS AHEAD! Eating Raoul perfectly satirized an "ordinary, run-of-the-mill" couple who tried to reach their dream while they coped with the swingers' way of life in 80s Hollywood. As Raoul, a professional criminal posing as a locksmith (excellently portrayed by Robert Beltran), "worms" his way into Paul and Mary's life (and Paul's wife!), he takes full advantage of their naiveté. But, Raoul gets his in the end!! In this writer's opinion, there was something eerily amusing about Raoul missing from the final "dinner" scene...in the normal physical sense, of course! Cheers to Paul and Mary Bland and their achievement of the "great American scheme dream"!!

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