Election

2005

Crime / Drama / Thriller

182
IMDb Rating 7.1 10 9,013

Synopsis


Downloaded times
May 28, 2020

Director

Cast

Simon Yam as Kwan Fu-Keung
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
917.87 MB
1280*720
Chinese 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
101 min
P/S N/A / N/A
1.84 GB
1920×1080
Chinese 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
101 min
P/S N/A / N/A

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by benjamin_lappin 6 / 10 / 10

I Vote...It's "Decent Enough"

The issue with IMDb in regards to foreign films such as 'Election' is that inevitably few have seen the film, fewer have chosen to put themselves in the firing line with a synopsis, and all will mark begrudgingly out of preference and favouritism rather than critical accuracy. Was I expecting more from this film? Given that it was on offer, I had finance at hand, and I purchased with intent to merely fill up my East Asian collection, no. Given that the film was Johnny To, was an official Cannes selection and had won as many awards as the impeccable Infernal Affairs, the answer is a resounding yes. Without wishing to sound too condescending before hitting the heart of the review, you can often (not always) gauge the credibility of a film based on where the "quotes" on the DVD box have originated. In England, the usual credible resources are Empire, The Observer/Guardian, probably The Independent and for the most part Johnathon Ross, so given that this film has been brandished a five star rating by "NEO" sent alarm bells ringing, but I am open minded, and do not let nonsense like that sway my opinion. Election is severely interesting on the basis of it being a pure triad film. Obviously my knowledge of the organisation is severely limited, but from what I can ascertain this is as "realistic" as you will get, next to standing in the room itself, as the rituals and ceremonies have all been meticulously planned, structured and filmed. In this sense, Election manages to bring out the very best in Eastern cinema, the rich culture (despite the notorious background of the Triad) steeped in tradition holding important virtues and values such as honour, which have all too often have been left behind in the Middle Ages. Election provides what can only be described as a rare insight, and chances are you will not find another film (barring Volume II) which will be as true and as accurate as this. Other plus points include the strength of the cinematography, typically shot in clean contrast with vivid colours and engaging compositions, while the acting is convincing with some slick performances from Tony Leung and Simon Yam. Election confronts the issue of the modern globalised world coming into conflict with the traditions of heritage of the triad which are seemingly being swamped by the sheer force of power the outside world, and in particular capitalism, possesses. However, and yes it was inevitable, the script, despite having won the award for Best Screenplay at the Hong Kong Film Festival is decidedly average if not poor. The performances aside, it does very little to engage you as an audience, nor does it contain a gravitas to sweep you off your feet and cart you away down a roller-coaster ride, and perhaps this is the directors want. However The Godfather, for example was a film which had a relatively slow paced storyline, yet you were utterly immersed for nigh on three hours, with Election the 100 minutes, feels like three hours, and that is not a good thing. Not enough actually takes place on screen to engage you, there are debates among elders about who should be the next Chairman, you see the candidates approach other members of the triad to ask for their support, you see more debating, you see various characters obviously being set up to be more important in volumes II and III, and you see some good acting go to waste with not much happening. I did want to like this film immensely, and I gave it all the time it needed, but it did not give me that essential x-factor which grabs you and slaps you around, so that when all is finished you need a moment to recover. There are many plus points, and I don't discount the possibility that I could be proved wrong on all these counts when viewed as an entire trilogy, but as a singular film Election falls into the trap so many foreign films do, excellent intentions, decent execution, and that is this film in a nutshell, it's decent. Don't expect a rip-roaring wild ride, expect a fairly entertaining trip, a leisurely drive through the world of the triads with acting that is superb but a story which is average, stunning visuals and clichéd endings. One review (from "Total Film" *insert raised eyebrow here*) calls this "unflinching brutality", and if you were expecting a whole lot more, it certainly can be.

Reviewed by pavithran 7 / 10 / 10

A good watch

Personally, I find the movie to be quite a good watch. It outlines the actual situation of triads in Hong Kong and gives the viewer a glimpse of how triads are organized. Not only that, it also shows the viewer how the Hong Kong police control the triad situation and why the police don't just go all out and wipe out triads. Overall, the movie is rather violent due to the gangland methods of killings & torture. Nevertheless, the movie stays true to the real world, thus the violence on screen is just a reflection of what really happens. I'd recommend this movie to any Triad/Mafia movie fan. Another good watch would be Dragon Squad. That movie has more guns than this, as in this movie there's more knives than guns (in fact I don't remember seeing a single gun).

Reviewed by samuelding85 7 / 10 / 10

Brotherhood of Power

Election marks the 2nd trial society theme movie directed by Johnnie To. To marvellously casted Simon Yan and Tony Leung Kar Fai as Lok and Big D, as the two trial members who were chosen as candidates for the position of chairman for Ho Sing society, a 100 year old trial society. While Lok is a man who keeps his cool at all times, Big D is not only impatient, but also thinks that he is on top of everything. Lok was chosen as the next chairman for 2 years. To have the total control of the gang, the newly elected chairman must be passed down with a Dragon Baton, which represents power and authority. Big D was extremely unhappy with the results that he was not chosen to be the next chairman after paying a handsome figure of bribes to the council members. He ordered his man to get the Baton before it falls onto the hands of Lok. While Big D is getting the Baton, Lok has other plans for him. This is one of the trial society theme movies where not much bloodshed is needed. Johnnie To puts the greed of the human beings in the movie, where bloodshed is commonly used in other trial society theme movies to show how the greed of human beings can caused the death or the downfall of one. However, no single bullet is used, hardly any gangfights are involved in Election. It's the battle of the wits that makes Election stands out of the rest. Apart from Maggie Shiu, the only actress in Election with less than 5 lines to talk in the whole movie, masculinity rules the whole movie. Louis Koo and Nick Cheung, who was seen in To's previous film, are casted as an undercover cop and a gangster who sold his life to the gang respectively. Together with some of the veteran actors making their appearance in the film and the excellent script, it makes the only HK movie to represent Cannes Fil Festival 2005. Election has hardly failed any critics who wants an different trial society theme movie.

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