Emma.

2020

Comedy / Drama

48
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 85%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 72%
IMDb Rating 7 10 2,104

Synopsis


Downloaded times
March 22, 2020

Director

Cast

Anya Taylor-Joy as Emma Woodhouse
Bill Nighy as Ray Simms
Johnny Flynn as Arthur
Rupert Graves as Mr. Weston
720p.WEB 1080p.WEB
1.07 GB
1280*720
English 2.0
PG
23.976 fps
125 min
P/S N/A / N/A
2.2 GB
1920×1080
English 2.0
PG
23.976 fps
125 min
P/S N/A / N/A

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by jayemacleay 3 / 10 / 10

Sublime to look at, painful to watch .....

If you love pantomime, you'll love the latest incarnation of Jane Austen's Emma. If you've read the book or seen the TVC series or last film adaption, all I can say is if you set great expectations your bound to be disappointed with this latest incarnation that leaves you walking out of the cinema saying why ....... The film is beautifully shot, the costumes and cinematographic should win awards .... where it does fall over is the acting .... Jane was making a parody of the upper and middle classes ... but this version slams people over the head with the delivery and over dramatised characterisation of the characters, there is no humanity or redeemable features in any of them ... just comical and inane pauses, over dramatisation .... If you come out of a movie vainly trying to find its redeemable features like Miranda Hart's version of Miss Bates or Connor Swindells Mr Martin, I am struggling to find any improvement of past versions of this novel. The only benefit to this movie is that it'll get your girlfriend, wife or nan out of the house for a few hours lets leave it at that .....

Reviewed by KittyG26 6 / 10 / 10

Beautiful to look at, but shallow

It looks gorgeous - fashions, interiors, etc - and it has a good cast. But it lacks the depth, subtle observation and wit of Austen's superb novel. Some of the characters are more like caricatures (Mr Woodhouse and Mr Elton, in particular). This works well in Dickens but not for Austen. It is difficult, admittedly, within the space of a two-hour movie to show character development and to do justice to the subplots, consequently some aspects of the story seemed very rushed. Yet the director wastes valuable screen time showing people walking down corridors, strolling about in the grounds, etc. Also - huge problem here - Anya Taylor-Joy and Johnny Flynn (both good actors) have a serious lack of on-screen chemistry. Disappointing! Can't hold a candle to the 1996 version starting Gwynneth Paltrow and Jeremy Northam, in my view.

Reviewed by Flippitygibbit 6 / 10 / 10

All bonnet and no breeches

Autumn de Wilde's Emma, with Anya Taylor-Joy and Johnny Flynn, is not my cup of tea, I'm afraid. My review might be influenced by how much I love Jane Austen's novel and how many times I've watched the 2009 miniseries, but I always give every adaptation a try. And I can't really judge if what I was watching would make sense to an Austen virgin, shall we say, so what seemed disjointed and rushed to me might work perfectly for others. I'll start with the good: I loved the costumes and the interiors, which were sumptuously beautiful. The wood-shaving ringlets on the women and the high collars on the men were distracting, though. And of course Anya Taylor-Joy made for a quirky and regal Emma (Austenites will be pleased to note that she has perfect posture.) I also loved how Anya Taylor-Joy and Amber Anderson as Jane actually played the pianoforte during the Coles' party (but could have done without Mr Knightley's contribution, when Frank Churchill is supposed to be singing with Jane). BUT. The music was horrendously jarring, alternating between Hanna Barbera cartoon incidentals and freakish folk music. The supporting characters suffered once again - I couldn't honestly tell the difference between Mrs Weston, Mrs Knightley and Mrs Elton, except that Isabella was for some reason a complete cow in this version, and Mr Elton and Frank Churchill were also interchangeable (perhaps that's why Elton never seemed to be without his dog collar, to help tell them apart). Bill Nighy's Mr Woodhouse was a weird combination of fusspot and Edwardian fop, and Johnny Flynn's Mr Knightley strayed way off character by stripping off in his first scene and never really recovered for me. (Apparently, that was a way of 'humanising' the character because he is always 'mansplaining' - very woke.) Anya wasn't kidding when she talked about the focus being on 'bodily functions', by the way - not only are we 'treated' to Knightley's backside, but Emma hitches up her skirts to warm her bare arse by the fire, and the 'cannot make speeches' proposal scene is a bloody mess. Literally. The script leans so heavily on lines from the novel that I think Eleanor Catton thought she was writing an essay for an English Lit exam - Austenites will be happy, but there was no feeling behind any of the grand words. When Emma and Mr Knightley argue, they constantly shout over each other, for instance, instead of the usual playful back and forth. The whole film felt like a weird mashup between a stage musical and a Victorian farce, with choreographed servants and slapstick humour. There was also a lot of 1996 Emma in there, taking pastel and pastoral scenery from the film and Andrew Davies' wearisome obsession with wealth from the television two-parter. Not on a sliding scale of Emma and Miss Bates, but in how Mr Knightley's strawberry picking party turns into a National Trust promotional video for Wilton House, Salisbury. There's also a lot of emphasis on servants dressing their masters and mistresses, presumably to fit in more scenes of 'natural nudity'. I went, I watched, I did my duty to Emma. But I think I'll stick with the 2009 miniseries.

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