History of the World: Part I

1981

Comedy / History / Musical

165
IMDb Rating 6.9 10 45,138

Synopsis


Downloaded times
October 12, 2020

Director

Cast

Cloris Leachman as Ruth Popper
John Hurt as Jesus - The Roman Empire
Mel Brooks as Moses / Comicus / Torquemada / Jacques / King Louis XVI
Orson Welles as Narrator
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
847.22 MB
1280*720
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
92 min
P/S N/A / N/A
1.7 GB
1920×1080
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
92 min
P/S N/A / N/A

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by claudio_carvalho 7 / 10 / 10

It's Good to Be a King

Divided in six segments ("The Stone Age"; "The Old Testament"; "The Roman Empire"; "The Spanish Inquisition"; "The French Revolution"; and "Previews of Coming Attractions"), "History of the World: Part I" is an uneven parody of historical moments, but still worthwhile watching. This film is written, directed and produced by Mel Brooks, who is also the lead actor performing five roles. It is also the debut of Gregory Hines, who died so young. Narrated by Orson Welles, the film has a great cast and cameo appearance of many famous people. Last but not the least, there is no sequel and Part I is another Mel Brook's joke, since Sir Walter Raleigh wrote The History of the World Volume 1 but was beheaded before writing the Volume 2. My vote is seven. Title (Brazil): "A História do Mundo: Parte I" ("The History of the World: Part I")

Reviewed by theowinthrop 10 / 10 / 10

I'm Still Awaiting Part II and "Hitler on Ice"

Mel Brooks did not invent the comedy spoof movie, but his best work ("Blazing Saddles", "Young Frankenstein", "Dracula, Dead And Loving It", and "High Anxiety") certainly make the most of it - even if some of it gets rather too dirty (literally dirty - "caca" dirty). "History Of The World" is a funny film, but it is not one of his best films. It looks like it was based on bits and pieces of ideas that could have been built up into separate movies: a film about the stone age, a film about the Roman Empire, a film about the French Revolution. I am sure that Brooks was inventive enough to have created three film spoofs, but for some reason he decided to just concentrate on pasting these mini-spoofs together. It has wonderful moments in it - some are thrown away. The four desperate refugees from the Roman Empire, followed by centurions, pray for a miracle. Suddenly they see an old man - Brooks dressed like Moses (from an earlier sequence in the film). A river is parted like the Red Sea with "Moses" arms in the air. The refugees flee thanking God and Moses. In a moment we see there is a robber in back of "Moses" holding him up (hence his arms in the air), and when the robber leaves the old man starts cursing him. Similar stuff is throughout the film (typical of Brooks' inventiveness). After fleeing Rome, Brooks has reached Palestine and is the waiter serving the "Last Supper". Besides having a problem when he keeps saying "JEEZUS" causing John Hurt (who is Christ) to ask, "Yes?", there is the problem of the painting being done by Da Vinci (Art Metrano), and how Brooks manages to get into the background of the masterpiece - holding his tray like a halo behind Hurt). Brooks uses a number of his regulars in the film: Madeline Kahn as the Empress Nympho, Dom DeLuis as the Emperor (one could call him "piggy" after one particular comment about his eating habits), Harvey Korman as the foppish Count du Monet, Sid Caesar as a caveman who is full of awe. He was also lucky to have Gregory Hines, usually a dancer but here a strikingly breezy comic, and Orson Welles doing the narration properly (note his voice's confusion at the start when describing the first heterosexual marriage, followed by the first homosexual one). The disjointed style is a minor problem in enjoying the film. Judging from the final scenes from the sequel, Brooks could have done a Viking movie, a skating film about Nazism, and a space musical about the Jews. Alas, only those scenes were ever shot. A second part might not have been a great film either, but it would have been quite as amusing.

Reviewed by Joekingfans 10 / 10 / 10

Like The Line In The Inquisition Song, "What A Show!"

The "Part I" in the title of the film was kind of an inside joke about sequels and film series. After all, if they have a "Rocky II," "Rocky III," "Rocky IV," "Rocky V," etc., how come there was never a "Rocky I?" Mel Brooks delivers a critique of today's religion and politics but with characters and situations set ages ago. After all, the proverbial question set by characters from thousands of years ago, "But what about the poor?" The "F Word" reply given in unison by the chorus of ancient politicians was really a social commentary on contemporary politics. Mel Brooks' musical extravaganza on "The Inquisition" was not just a commentary of a dark, violent, regrettable page of history on the Catholic Church, but a commentary on a few aspects of today's religious issues. Some people in the audience may have felt that some of the religious humor was too disrespectful, with characters in the scenes like Moses, Jesus, priests, nuns, etc. The rule of thumb on that is that you can have Biblical and religious characters in your humor, as long as you're making fun with them, rather than at them. After all, when was the last time you thought about God? Anytime people start talking and thinking about religion, their beliefs or disbeliefs, it's good. It's thought provoking. It would be too "in your face" to use contemporary public figures to make commentary like that. After all, this is a Mel Brooks motion picture for the movie theater where you pay for a ticket and expect quality -- not an episode of "Saturday Night Live" that keeps recycling old jokes with new faces. That's why it's good taste to make your comedic critique with characters and situations set hundreds or thousands of years ago as Mel Brooks did in the first place. "The History Of The World -- Part I" is a delightful comedy. If you haven't seen it yet, it's worth your while.

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