La Haine

1995

Crime / Drama

166
IMDb Rating 8.1 10 138,536

Synopsis


Downloaded times
April 25, 2020

Cast

Mathieu Kassovitz as Man on the Street
Vincent Cassel as Bruno Haroche
Vincent Lindon as Laurent Amédéo
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
898.26 MB
1280*720
French 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
98 min
P/S N/A / N/A
1.8 GB
1920×1080
French 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
98 min
P/S N/A / N/A

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by gogoschka-1 10 / 10 / 10

The most relevant French film of the last 20 years

'Mean Streets' in french - and so much more. While there are so many references to Scorsese that you could almost call it an homage, this French milestone deals with the disillusioned youth who live in the outskirts of Paris in such an elegant - and honest - way, that I would go so far as to call it the most relevant French film of the last 20 years. But it's also a cinematic masterpiece and great, often hilarious entertainment. Everything fits: the musical choices, the outstanding performances by the 3 main characters, the beautiful cinematography and flawless direction. And, perhaps most of all, THE perfect script. As much a realistic portrayal of a torn society as it is an artistic achievement, 'La Haine' is essential viewing. My vote: 10 out of 10 Favorite films: http://www.IMDb.com/list/mkjOKvqlSBs/ Lesser-known Masterpieces: http://www.imdb.com/list/ls070242495/ Favorite Low-Budget and B-movies: http://www.imdb.com/list/ls054808375/ Favorite TV-Shows reviewed: http://www.imdb.com/list/ls075552387/

Reviewed by classicsoncall 8 / 10 / 10

"...it's not how you fall that matters. It's how you land."

After watching this film I reflected back on a whole host of films I've seen produced by Warner Brothers back in the Forties and Fifties, having to do with the subject of poverty and how that can lead to crime and lost lives. In a lot of cases, civic and moral dilemmas could often be resolved with right winning out over wrong in the end. In today's world, 'right' often comes up empty handed, and often there's a fine line between differentiating the good from the bad. In many cases, moral equivalency enters the picture, and we're left to distinguish between bad and less bad. It doesn't make for a hopeful situation. That's the sort of picture "La Haine" is. Translated, it means 'Hate', and that emotion is palpable throughout the story of three young men with no direction, no job, and nothing to do with themselves except kill time by hanging around in one section of the city or another. Being a French film, the city in this case is Paris, but not the Paris one sees in travel brochures. This story is set in an area of depressing housing projects where the chances of upward mobility doesn't exist, exacerbated by tensions between the police and a diverse population trying to make ends meet. The film is book-ended by an idea submitted as a conversation about a person falling from a high rise window. All the way down, the soon to be deceased person maintains a momentary positive attitude by repeating to himself, 'so far so good', with a corollary offered by the listener that 'it's not how you fall that matters, it's how you land'. This would appear to be good advice for the three principal characters, Said, Vinz and Hubert if they only had the temperament to look at their lives objectively and realize that no one was going to come to their rescue as victims of the projects. That they would have to do for themselves. But with those whose inner rage has ratcheted up to a boiling point, an inevitable hard landing is virtually assured. I thought this was a good film for what it was, even though it doesn't try to provide any answers. The answers, as most rational people know, lie within one's self, and there are many real life examples one can point to of people digging themselves out of a hole to become worthwhile and productive citizens. Unfortunately, many never figure it out, and 'so far, so good' almost never lasts.

Reviewed by Atlaz 8 / 10 / 10

Better and Better

I have seen La Haine a handful of times now and with each viewing it just gets better. The first thing that stands out about the film is the cinematography. It's rare that a film like this is considered both genuine and a good example of it's art but La Haine is both. The plotline is compelling and realistic and neatly shows the way that inner city life has gone in the big cities in France as well as proving that despite the romance of Paris, it suffers from the same problems as any other major city. The characters are above all believable and the cast did a great job. The quality of acting is simply stunning from several actors and it would be a shame if it was simply dismissed as "just another foreign art-house movie" by audiences outside France. Above all the film whilst showing the influences of American films and society has a very clear sense of it's own identity and at no time does it feel like another US Ghetto film transposed to France. This is a major boon to the film and it stands out of the crowd for this, even though many people will dislike it because of this. It is, however, their loss. It's hard to recommend this film highly enough, but I should add that more than one viewing is required to get the best from La Haine.

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