McLintock!

1963

Comedy / Romance / Western

73
IMDb Rating 7.2 10 12,731

Synopsis


Downloaded times
December 13, 2020

Cast

John Wayne as Rock
Maureen O'Hara as Katherine Gilhooley McLintock
Patrick Wayne as Devlin Warren
Yvonne De Carlo as Louise Warren
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
1.14 GB
1280*720
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
127 min
P/S N/A / N/A
2.11 GB
1920×1080
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
127 min
P/S N/A / N/A

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by bsmith5552 7 / 10 / 10

"The Taming of the Shrew "Goes West!

"McClintock" is loosely based on William Skakespesre's "The Taming of the Shrew". It is not your usual John Wayne western (in fact he doesn't draw his six shooter even once), but is more of a broad comedy with a tip of the hat to John Ford. This film was the first to be produced by Wayne's son Michael who had basically taken over the running of Wayne's production company Batjac. It also was the first major feature to be directed by Andrew V. McLaglen who had learned his trade as an assistant on previous Wayne features and on TV. He is also the son of former Wayne co-star Victor McLaglan. The story is simple. G.W. McClintock (Wayne) is rough and tumble hard drinking rancher whose estranged wife of two years, Katherine (Maureen O'Hara) has returned to try to gain custody of their daughter Becky (Stephanie Powers). The conflict between the two forms the basis for the rest of the picture. Into the mix comes a widowed settler Mrs. Warren (Yvonne DeCarlo) and her son Devlin (Patrick Wayne) who becomes enamored of Becky. The chemistry between Wayne and O'Hara makes this film go. The big gruff Wayne vs. the fiery Irish redhead provides much of the humor of the piece. The scene for which this film is probably best remembered is the fight at the top of a mud slide Most of the combatants, including the two stars wind up going down the slide into a pool of mud below. And then there's the climatic chase through the streets. The film features most of the members of the John Wayne stock company. Chill Wills plays Wayne's foreman Drago, Bruce Cabot as a rival rancher, Hank Worden as "Curley", Ed Faulkner as Cabot's son, Chuck Roberson as the Sheriff and Bob Steele as a train engineer. Other familiar faces include Jack Kruschen as storekeeper Jake Birnbaum, Jerry Van Dyke as Junior a rival suitor for Becky, Perry Lopez as Davey Elk an educated Indian, Strother Martin as Agard the Indian agent, Gordon Jones as Douglas, McClintock's longtime nemesis, Robert Lowery as the governor, Michael Pate as Puma the Commanche chief, Marie Blanchard as saloon girl Camille and Leo Gordon as the settler who is the first to go down the famous mud slide. A little devoid of action (there are no gunfights or saloon brawls), McClintock remains one of Wayne's most popular films. The Paramount DVD release is billed as the "Authentic" Collector's Edition. Some years ago, the film somehow fell into the public domain and an inferior version of the film has been floating about the bargain bins as a result. This release however, restores the film to its widescreen aspect ratio as well as, showing its rich and vibrant colors. There is also interviews with the ageless Maureen O'Hara (still looking as beautiful as ever in her 80s) and Stephanie Powers who looks better now than she did in the film. Leonard Maltin hosts the various segments and provides a feature length commentary along with film historian Frank Thompson, O'Hara, Powers and Michael Pate. Great fun.

Reviewed by jhclues 7 / 10 / 10

The Duke At His Best

This is the Duke at his two-fisted, brawling best, along with Maureen O'Hara, who lights up the screen, in `McLintock!' a rousing western/comedy directed by Andrew W. McLaglen. John Wayne is George Washington McLintock, cattle baron and owner of just about everything around for as far as the eye can see. He owns cattle, mines and lumber, and even the town is named after him. And he's a fair man and a good employer to boot, who pays a fair wage for a good day's work. He even hires a young man, Devlin Warren (Patrick Wayne), who has come in with a group of homesteaders who have been given land by the government and plan to farm the Mesa Verde, even though, as McLintock warns them, it's impossible to farm at 6000 feet above sea level. In the meantime, young Devlin has to support his mother, Louise (Yvonne De Carlo) and his sister, Alice (Aissa Wayne). So G.W. even hires Louise to be the cook for his outfit. McLintock is The Man in these parts, and he earns the respect he is accorded by most of the good citizens of the territory. But he has one problem, and it's a big one; and it comes in quite a package: His estranged wife, Katherine (O'Hara), who has just come back to town to settle a certain issue with her husband. And the fireworks begin the minute she steps off the train. The main bone of contention has to do with their daughter, Becky (Stefanie Powers), who will be returning home from college soon. Katherine wants to take her east to live; G.W. in having none of it. And shades of `Who Wants To Be A Millionaire,' that's his final answer. The real rub is that G.W. still loves Katherine, and he still doesn't know what put the burr in her saddle and caused her to leave him two years earlier. It's also obvious that Katherine still loves G.W., but she apparently can't get past whatever it was that caused the split in the first place. But her eyes sparkle whenever Drago (Chill Wills), G.W.'s right hand man, brings up the `good ol' days,' and she's reminded of when they started out with nothing but each other and a lot of love and courage. There's a touch of `Taming of the Shrew,' in this story, and near the end Wayne and O'Hara virtually reenact one of their own scenes from `The Quiet Man,' all of which adds up to a couple of hours worth of good, old fashioned fun. This movie never pretends or aspires to be anything other than what it is, which is good, wholesome entertainment that features some memorable characters, lots of humor and some classic lines. The Duke is trim and healthy and never swaggered better, and O'Hara, in a green dress against which her gorgeous red hair absolutely glows, makes you wonder if there's ever been a more beautiful actress ever to grace the silver screen. And the two of them have a chemistry together that ranks right up there with the best pairings the movies ever had to offer. The Duke may be in command, but he certainly has his hands full with that fighting Irish wildcat, O'Hara. Together, they've created some moments on screen that will live forever. Adding to the merriment is an all-star supporting cast that includes Jerry Van Dyke (Matt, Jr.), Hank Worden (Curly), Bruce Cabot (Ben), Jack Kruschen (Jake), Edgar Buchanan (Bunny), Perry Lopez (Davey Elk), Michael Pate (Puma), Strother Martin (Agard), Gordon Jones (Douglas), Robert Lowery (Governor Humphrey), H.W. Gim (Ching), Edward Faulkner (Young Ben), Chuck Roberson (Sheriff), Mari Blanchard (Camille), Leo Gordon (Jones), Bob Steele (Train Engineer) and Big John Hamilton (Fauntleroy). McLaglen sets the pace and keeps this vintage Wayne/O'Hara vehicle right on task, which makes `McLintock!' a classic in it's own right. It's a timeless film that captures the attitude and freedom of a time gone by that simply does not exist anymore in this, our `advanced' era of political correctness, which often stifles the very freedom it espouses. And watching this movie, it makes you wonder about the `progress' we've made in the past thirty years or so. As far as movies go, this one is magic, and it proves that they just don't make ‘em like they used to. I rate this one 9/10.

Reviewed by didi-5 7 / 10 / 10

typical Big John Wayne

Directed by Andrew MacLaglan, this rip-roaring John Wayne-Maureen O'Hara comedy lets them do what they did best. Wayne plays George Washington McLintock, a brawler and he-man in typical Western setting. O'Hara plays his feisty wife and Stefanie Powers their bratty daughter, Becky. Patrick Wayne, son of Big John, plays Becky's intended, a young man who looks like he'll wind up just like her pa. 'McLintock' is fast, furious, and funny. About as far from PC as you can get, this Western take on The Taming of the Shrew is bawdy and boisterous, and the casting is perfect. John Wayne was a man's man in the 'gotta do what he has to do' mould and this role was perfect. O'Hara - his best co-star - is also superb.

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