Molière

2007

Biography / Comedy

119
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 69%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 79%
IMDb Rating 7.2 10 5,641

Synopsis


Downloaded times
September 26, 2020

Director

Cast

François Civil as Louis Béjart - 14 ans
Laura Morante as Elmire Jourdain
Ludivine Sagnier as Célimène
720p.WEB 1080p.WEB
1.08 GB
1280*720
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
120 min
P/S N/A / N/A
2.23 GB
1920×1080
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
120 min
P/S N/A / N/A

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by hitchcockhill 10 / 10 / 10

Closing Night at the Seattle International Film Festival

The Seattle International Film festival has saved us from a droll and boring summer movie season. With sequels galore and some atrocious originals, it was nice to catch a screening of the closing night film at the festival last night: Molière. The film wins big, and hopefully will be nominated for best French film, director and actor (Romain Duris) when the Césars roll around next spring. Molière is France's Shakespeare and his life and plays might not be familiar to most Americans. So French director Laurent Tirard decided three years ago to make a film that would bring the work and escapades of the famed writer more accessible to audiences. Tirard co-wrote the screenplay and assembled a top notch cast including Romain Duris (The Beat That My Heart Skipped), Fabrice Luchini (Intimate Strangers), Laura Morante (Avenue Montaigne) Edouard Baer (The Story of My Life), and the always wonderful Ludivine Sagnier (Swimming Pool). The story begins with Jean-Baptists Poquelin aka Molière (Duris) frantically trying to decide if he is to do a tragedy for his next play in front of the esteemed royal family despite the fact they desperately want a comedy. The film flashes back thirteen years earlier to when Poquelin has been thrown into jail because he could not pay a debt. While in jail, Monsieur Jourdain (Luchini) seeks out Molière's theatrical talents. Molière is whisked away to the Jourdain estate in disguise where he must help Jourdain win the esteem of a desired mistress (Sagnier) while keeping this all hidden from the eyes of Mme. Jourdain (Morante). In exchange for his services Molière's debt will be paid and forgiven. Bits and pieces of the rest of story seem familiar to anyone who's read Molière's plays, as this film sets the stage that these events inspire Molière to be the comedy writer that he became. The film wins on many levels. The acting talent of Duris alone merits a viewing as well as the beautiful cinematography by Gilles Henry. The images were very colorful and beautifully framed. The magnificent locations that only France has to offer were wonderfully highlighted as well as extravagant costume design, hair and make up. The score written by Frédéric Talgorn was by far one of the best parts. His ability to weave fifteenth century musical themes into a robust, fun and energetic comedy score definitely is worth a second listening at home on a nice speaker system. Oh yeah, the film is also actually funny! There are some great scenes from the plays as well as some nice jokes toward a modern audience. Molière has everything. It is a fantastically crafted and brilliant look at one of France's most famous artists. The film may run a bit long for some, but it's hardly noticeable when juxtaposed with the brilliants visuals, fantastic acting and wonderful music and sound design. The film also has heart and leaves us with a nice message to ponder when leaving the theater. When Molière releases in your area, don't miss it. The film is also appropriate for teenagers as the sexual content is rather minor. French teachers around America rejoice at a PG-13 French film they can show to their classes! Don't wait for DVD though; see this one on a big screen.

Reviewed by howard.schumann 8 / 10 / 10

Romantic and richly entertaining

While New York Times film critic A.O. Scott may rail at the "fundamentally bogus and anti-literary idea that the great writers of the past wrote what they knew", there is still a pervasive longing out there to discover the connection between an author's life and his work. The audacious premise that great art reflects an author's life experience is promoted in films such as John Madden's Shakespeare in Love and now in Moliére, Laurent Tirard's speculative costume drama of the great French playwright. While the suggestion that the mystery of genius lies in a secret love affair borders on the banal, these films attempt to give us a sense of who these great artists were as people and what may have been at least one source of their inspiration. Like Shakespeare in Love, Moliére uses guesswork, imagination, and creativity to fill in the blanks when the facts are not readily available. What we do know about the life of Jean-Baptiste Poquelin known to the world as Moliére is scanty. In 1644 he was a 22-year old actor who spent some time in debtor's prison after his touring company went bankrupt. After that the young actor and aspiring playwright disappeared for several months before he surfaced in the provinces. It was there that he toured with his Illustre Theatre for 13 years before arriving in Paris convinced that tragedy was the only true theater. Of course, what is not known is what inspired him to take a comic turn, but Tirard allows us to imagine characters and situations that might have led to such great works as "Tartuffe" and "Le Bourgeois Gentlhomme" and 28 other plays which roast the upper classes as affected hypocrites and worse. Soulfully and convincingly performed by Romain Duris, who has been known for dramatic roles such as the pianist in The Beat That My Heart Skipped, Moliére is rescued from prison by a bumbling aristocrat named Monsieur Jourdain (Fabrice Luchini). Jourdain has written a one-act play that he wants to perform at the salon of the haughty widow, marquise Celimene (Ludivine Sagnier) with whom he is smitten. Paying Moliére's debts, he hires him to teach him the skills of an actor while tricking his graceful wife Elmire (Laura Morante) into believing that he is a priest named Mr. Tartuffe who has come only to counsel his daughter in matters of religion. This ruse runs into problems when Tartuffe/Moliére's falls in love with Madame Jourdain; however their relationship becomes a transforming experience for the actor/playwright when she suggests that he concentrate on writing a different kind of comedy, one that probes the emotions of a drama. Complications are plentiful as the story moves from comedy to farce, to tragedy and back again with the assistance of a scheming count named Dorante (Edouard Baer) whose goal is to marry his son Thomas (Gillian Petrovsky) to Jourdain's daughter Henriette (Fanny Valette) regardless of the fact that Henriette is in love with her music teacher Valere (Gonzague Requillart). Moliére may not fully capture the true essence of the French author but the fact that it does suggest a writer of depth, wit, and inspiration may entice the viewer to seek out the source material first hand. Granted that the film is speculation, not biography, but it is art and the payoff is a romantic and richly entertaining tribute to one of the greatest playwrights in history.

Reviewed by Red-125 8 / 10 / 10

Molière in Love

Molière (2007), co-written and directed by Laurent Tirard, creatively fills a historical gap that exists in the biography of the playwright/actor Molière. Apparently, Molière was released from debtors prison, and did not rejoin his acting company for several months. The movie provides us with a fictional reconstruction of what went on during that time span. Like many period films, this movie has high production values. The sets and costumes are glorious, and we are spared the usual obligatory images of filth and squalor. Instead, most of the film takes place in the château of the very wealthy M. Jourdain (Fabrice Luchini), and his dutiful--if somewhat bored--wife (Laura Morante). Ludivine Sagnier plays a wealthy young widow, the Marquise Célimène. The plot revolves around M. Jourdain's worshipful love for the Marquise. The Marquise barely knows he exists and so M. Jourdain proposes to hire Molière to teach him how to make a good impression on the object of his desires. The Marquise is self-centered, vain, and proud, and M. Jourdain is a fool. However, he is a rich fool, and can afford to go where his whims take him. Molière accepts the job, and the film moves forward from there. Romain Duris is very good as Molière. He reminds me of Johnny Depp, and, like Depp, he overplays his role in a humorous and enjoyable way . Fabrice Luchini is excellent as M. Jourdain--a man who has a wonderful wife but lusts after an unattainable and unlikeable woman. Laura Morante is outstanding as the wife, who lives with luxury but not with love. Ms. Morante is Italian, so it's not clear to me whether her voice was dubbed. In any case, she plays her role with skill and subtlety, and she has a presence that lights up the screen. This film will remind you of "Shakespeare in Love" and "Becoming Jane." It tries to correlate the artist's experiences--about which we can only speculate--with his or her art, about which we know a great deal. It is obviously unlikely that we will ever learn what led Austen or Shakespeare or Molière to write their masterpieces. Because this vacuum exists, writers and directors are free to speculate about events, and present these speculations to us in the form of movies. I enjoyed both "Shakespeare in Love" and "Becoming Jane," and I would put "Molière" into this same category--not a great film, but a very good film, and definitely worth seeing.

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