One Foot in Hell

1960

Western

113
IMDb Rating 6.2 10 416

Synopsis


Downloaded times
October 27, 2020

Director

Cast

Alan Ladd as Whispering Smith
Dan O'Herlihy as Sir Harry Ivers
Don Murray as Justinian
Karl Swenson as Sheriff Ole Olson
720p.WEB 1080p.WEB
827.24 MB
1280*720
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
90 min
P/S N/A / N/A
1.5 GB
1920×1080
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
90 min
P/S N/A / N/A

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by hitchcockthelegend 7 / 10 / 10

The last man and one dollar and eighty seven cents.

One Foot in Hell is directed by James B. Clark and written by Aaron Spelling and Sydney Boehm. It stars Alan Ladd, Don Murray, Dan O'Herlihy, Dolores Michaels, Barry Coe and Larry Gates. A CinemaScope/De Luxe Color production with music by Dominic Frontiere and cinematography by William C. Mellor. Incensed by the circumstances which led to the death of his wife and unborn child, Mitch Barrett (Ladd) plots revenge against the whole town of Blue Springs. Alan Ladd's last Western doesn't find him in the best of shape or on the best of form, but it's a most interesting and entertaining picture regardless. In a veer from the norm, Ladd is playing a man gone bad, fuelled by hatred and thirsting for revenge, Mitch Barrett assembles a small group of strays and ruffians and sets his plans in motion. He wins the trust of the town and operates behind the facade of the law. Along the way he is extremely callous, the value of life means nothing to him now, while inner fighting and romance destabilises the group until the big denouement arrives. The pace sometimes sags and there's a distinct rushed feel about the final quarter (one main character annoyingly dies off screen?!), yet there's still a lot to like here. The CinemaScope production is nice to look at, there's some very good scenes such as those involving cattle and liquid fire, while the all round nasty edge to the plotting and characterisations (Julie Reynolds' back story is a shocker) keeps it from being run of the mill. It's not the big Western send off that Ladd fans would have wanted, however it's still a recommended Western to like minded genre fans. 7/10

Reviewed by keandre2004 7 / 10 / 10

Loved this film

I absolutely loved this movie.I saw it on Encore for the first time a few nights ago.I've never seen Alan Ladd in a sinister type role.This movie reminded me of a more romantic earlier version of High Plains Drifter.Revenge is sweet!Maybe I'm just an Alan Ladd fan at heart but I thought this movie was great and I'm looking for a copy of it.I can't understand why he is referred to as "psychotic".I could almost feel his pain when he finally got to his wife with the medicine 2 minutes too late because of compassion-lacking townspeople.I didn't fall in love with the ending;I thought of his character as the good guy in the entire movie.Wish he had've gotten revenge without killing yet making those responsible pay for what they helped cause.Overall,great "western"!

Reviewed by bkoganbing 7 / 10 / 10

For $1.87

Alan Ladd's last western is this strange little item that did not get much play back in 1960, confined to second place on double bills. He should have done this one earlier when he was a much bigger box office name. Ladd plays a settler traveling west and his wife comes down with some prairie malady. Going off to the nearest town he gets a prescription for a $1.87 worth of medicine. But then he runs afoul of some of the town louts and gets delayed long enough so that his wife sickens and dies. The town fathers feel real sorry for him. In fact they feel so bad that they offer him the job of deputy sheriff. But when the sheriff dies and Ladd becomes sheriff it's the first step in an elaborate plan for revenge on the town. He hates each and every citizen of this place because of the death of wife Rachel Stephens. Ladd puts together a gang in secret to rob the town bank at a proper moment when it's bulging with cash. Among others in his scheme are drunken cowboy Don Murray and working girl Dolores Michaels. Murray's part is very similar to the one he had the year before with James Cagney in Shake Hands With The Devil. In fact if you've seen that film, you know what happens in One Foot In Hell. What could have been a great comeback role for Ladd goes for naught. I'm not sure it was his drinking at the time. More like it was wife Sue Carol who at this point was mismanaging his career. And face it, his day had past. But next to what he was about to do over in Italy in Duel of the Champions, One Foot In Hell comes out like Stagecoach. It's not a bad film, as good as any of the B westerns that Audie Murphy was doing at this time. Still had he been 10 years younger and the film had been distributed differently, say with Paramount's studio power back in the day when he was their biggest star, One Foot In Hell could have been a classic. As it is, it's not bad viewing. Note the script was by an up and coming television giant, Aaron Spelling.

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