People Will Talk

1951

Comedy / Drama / Romance

177
IMDb Rating 7.4 10 5,322

Synopsis


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October 27, 2020

Cast

Cary Grant as Dr. Noah Praetorius
Hume Cronyn as Prof. Rodney Elwell
Jeanne Crain as Deborah Higgins
Margaret Hamilton as Miss Sarah Pickett - Housekeeper
720p.WEB 1080p.WEB
1011.04 MB
1280*720
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
110 min
P/S N/A / N/A
1.83 GB
1920×1080
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
110 min
P/S N/A / N/A

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by Scott-52 9 / 10 / 10

Unconventional film gets better with each viewing

This gem just isn't given enough play. Actually, given the power of the forces it takes to task, it is a small miracle it even got made. In tackling the project, Mank riddled the medical profession, with a not too subtle sidetrip to take on McCarthyism. Cary Grant is more smooth and relaxed than usual, and actually seems to be enjoying the role. Jeanne Crain tackles a difficult (and not too well written, alas) part, and Walter Slezak does a nice turn as a collegue and crony of Grant's. Hume Cronyn is despicable as the jealous and zealous pracitioner, prosecutor and persecutor. This film didn't do well initially, but is now developing a cult following. It is one of those rare movies that gets better with each viewing.

Reviewed by sharlyfarley 6 / 10 / 10

Marvelous People, Splendid Talk

How many movies had a score by Brahms? 'People Will Talk' features his Academic Festival Overture, which is the only example of cheerful grandeur I can think of in serious music. Mankewicz knew what he was doing, because this is a cheerfully grand movie. While his 'Letter to three wives' and 'All About Eve' are more famous, this one is my favorite. For one thing, Cary Grant has never been more attractive, for Dr. Praetorious is a good and humane doctor. "I don't cure illness, I make sick people well." If the notion that a woman bearing a child out of wedlock is a disgrace has gone, the theme of the mediocre witch-hunting the brilliant is timeless. The phrase 'beloved character actor' could have been invented for Finlay Currie, but you've got to be able to use it for Walter Slezak - at least in this movie. (See "Lifeboat") If you spend two hours with these people, you'll hear some very splendid talk, and you'll feel both warmed and civilized. How many of today's movies do that?

Reviewed by RJBurke1942 6 / 10 / 10

People Will Talk – A comedy of the serious kind

When you get one of Hollywood's most powerful producers, Darryl F. Zanuck, working with a screenwriter/director, Joseph L. Mankiewicz, then you know you're in for a film that's a cut above the average. In this story, Cary Grant is a hugely successful doctor (as Dr Noah Praetorious) with unusual healing practices; Jeanne Crain (as Deborah Higgins) is an aspiring medical student who falls in love with him; the almost legendary Finlay Currie is a mysterious assistant (as Shunderson) to the doctor; another great character actor, Hume Cronyn, plays the devious and deceitful Prof. Elwell; and there is Walter Slezak as Prof. Barker, who provides (with Grant) much of the comedy and witty lines. This is an unusual story because it mixes genres: it's a comedy, it's a love story, it's a (double) mystery, and it's a drama. The first genre is provided largely by Cary Grant and Walter Slezak who bounce off each other with some of the best scenes and wittiest lines. The second, of course, is between Cary Grant and Jeanne Crain. The third is provided by Cary Grant and Finlay Currie, Grant being the doctor whose methods are suspect and his past under scrutiny by Prof. Elwell, while Currie is Grant's constant companion – aloof, quiet and almost robotic in his demeanour. But, who really is Shunderson? And the fourth is the drama between Dr Praetorious and Prof. Elwell, as the latter seeks to have the doctor expelled from the clinic and university for malpractice. Weaving those four elements together into a cohesive plot is no mean feat, but Mankiewicz succeeds brilliantly. The acting is superb, and even Jeanne Crain – not one of my favorites at all – manages to almost overshadow Hume Cronyn in a key scene where there is a battle of wills and words. The real surprise, however, is Finlay Currie who usually appears in biblical and/or historical dramas and who usually is given a lot to say in any of his film appearances. But, not in this one: in fact, he says hardly a word until almost the end, but simply maintains a deceptive and mysterious quietude at the side of Cary Grant. The resolution to that mystery is a tour de force – and with a twist. Even though I'm not a big comedy fan – it's the most difficult to portray on film – I'm very partial to Mankiewicz and his films. On that basis alone I'd recommend this film for you to see as another in the great tradition of Classic Hollywood Cinema. But, for anybody who likes the debonair Cary Grant, well, what are you waiting for…?

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