Samsara

2001

Adventure / Drama / Romance

105
IMDb Rating 7.8 10 7,421

Synopsis


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October 27, 2020

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720p.WEB 1080p.WEB
1.16 GB
1280*720
English 2.0
R
23.976 fps
138 min
P/S N/A / N/A
2.15 GB
1920×1080
English 2.0
R
23.976 fps
138 min
P/S N/A / N/A

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by s_warissara 10 / 10 / 10

Different way of interpretation of Buddism

I found this movie, a very interesting and meaningful. There were not more than 100 words went on in this movie but the picture itself, gave the viewer many things to think about. What Tashi really did was reversing the Buddha path. Buddha was the one normal human being before he realize the need to discover what life is all about, what he discovered was suffering in living one life. He tried to find the ways to settle with all the suffering, not by avoiding but realize that there are suffering and and he faced it in the noble way. Tashi, however, live his life in the monastery, believe in something he was told to believe not something that he discovered himself. Every human has the feeling of sexual awakening at one point of time, what Tashi did was that he quit the monk-hood, partly because the guiltiness of having such feeling but at the same time desire to discovered the reality for himself. HE entered into the life and began to discover with all the truth in the world, full with desire, anger, jealously, deception etc. but at the same time he discover love, caring, warmth, and happiness. The decision he chose, for me, he was running away from suffering by going back to peace and serenity of being monastery. What he did was not totally right or totally wrong but it does suggesting something. HE is avoiding all the desire that always backfire him throughout the movie. Pema came to him and enlighten him with her thought. Enlightenment does not mean that you have to quit all the normal life and being alone in the temple to cut all the desires. Maybe what make you enlightened is the fact that you stay in life and faced the suffering in the acceptable noble ways. Maybe it is satisfy most of the need but at the same time conquer your own self.

Reviewed by abisio 8 / 10 / 10

Profound and almost perfect

Samsara runs over two and a half hours, and arguably, it needs every minute. The story is minimal, what comes out of it is what make it worth. A young Lama (Tashi), after a three years, three months and three days meditation secluded in a cave, is returned to this monastery and ordered as a higher level monk. However, he begins to feel some sexual awareness precipitated for a brief contact with a young woman and hesitates about the life he had chosen. Considering that Buddha began his spiritual journey at 29 (Tashi is in his early twenties), he leaves the monastery and starts a normal agriculture life in the rural Himalayas. He of course will discover all the temptations, deceptions and frustrations of the world he never knew. And he will be corrupted too. This is not a commercial occidental movie, so even if the story seems predictable, nothing terribly dramatic or convulsed happens. The world we are seeing is a simple one. People could cheat on each others, but the value of life is high, as also is the value of love and the traditions. Tashi will try to change things but he will be the one changing. If changes are for good of evil, is for the viewer to decide. This is not a self discovery trip either (at least for Tashi). We are the one who discover that not world is absolutely better than the other, but the human being is capable of destroying everything with his own selfishness, particularly the ones who loves. There is not a moralizing tale here, easy answers and judgments are avoided but one. Tashi's wife final monologue, questioning the women's part in history and in the religion is as valid to Buddhism as to any other religion I know). That was an unexpected and essential surprise, creating the perfect end for an almost perfect movie.

Reviewed by lora_traykova 8 / 10 / 10

India is not Tibet

I have read all the comments on this film here and I was surprised one more time to see how differently people react to one and the same film. What struck me also was that some of the viewers clearly mistake Tibet for India, because apparently they don't know that there are Buddhists in India as well. Buddhism has its origins in Hinduism itself as it is believed that Buddha is a reincarnation of lord Vishnu The Preserver, one of the three main Hindu gods. But through the centuries Buddhism slowly developed as an independent religion. The film was shot in Ladakh which is in the Indian Himalayas, not in Tibet and two of the characters go to the town of Leh which is the capital of Ladakh and hence it is also in India. I thought that it is important to clarify these details as I don't think that one should mistake Tibet for India. India is not just Bollywood and as a country living under the phrase "unity in diversity" it surely has lots of different religious communities and lots of different cultures. As for the film itself - I loved it, not only because it has been so beautifully shot (by the Bulgarian D.P. Rali Ralchev) and not only because it meets us with a part of the world we barely know, but mostly because I could identify with the characters and their desires, anguish, pain, joy, dreams. "Samsara" (the Hindu concept of reincarnation) asks some philosophic questions in a very earthly manner, I think. The ideas of Buddhism, the detachment from earthly life in order to reach enlightenment, the conquering of ourselves, our ego, our earthly desires (to love, to have family, to enjoy the simple but earthly life of a farmer, to possess objects and to command love from the others) are ideas or rather dilemmas that many of us face from time to time. Buddha has said that the middle way is the right way to follow, but how can this way be found? Is it through experiencing the earthly life, then renouncing it and then devoting oneself to the life a monk, choosing the spiritual life in search of the almighty truth and the great soul? This was the way Buddha has chosen - being a prince himself, having a family, and then renouncing it and devoting himself to the life of a recluse, but of a recluse who has reached the enlightenment and a recluse willing to share the truth with the others. Everyone chooses one's own way. Tashi is a person who asks himself questions and he's a person who searches for his own right path. To say that he is only an egoist who leaves his wife when he gets fed up the life of a family man and a farmer is quite simplistic, I think. I believe he has been very honest from the beginning to the end and that is why he left the monastery at first and came back to it in the end. The important idea that I have discovered was that no matter what kind of path one will choose there will always be an anguish along the way. Maybe it is because of the eternal question unanswered - what to choose - to satisfy all desires or to conquer the one and only? No matter what we choose we will always doubt from time to time that maybe we should have chosen the opposite. What I really liked about this film also is the fact that it presented us with the female point of view in the final monologue of Tashi's wife Pema. She was given no choice from him when he decided to go back to the monastery. She had to stay behind and take care of their son. She was shown to us as the keeper of the traditions (not allowing her son to play with the modern toy his father bought him from Leh) but at the same time she had that free spirit to make love to the unknown Lama and afterward to even marry him. I liked the sensitivity of the writer / director who cared not only to show us the pain of Pema when realizing she's losing his husband, but also to make her an intelligent woman who thinks and who turns out be as wise and devoted as her Lama husband.

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