Stuck

2007

Biography / Crime / Drama / Horror / Thriller

48
IMDb Rating 6.4 10 9,312

Synopsis


Downloaded times
January 12, 2021

Director

Cast

Jeffrey Combs as 911 Operator
Mena Suvari as Brandi Boski
Rukiya Bernard as Tanya
Stephen Rea as Thomas Bardo
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
785.06 MB
1280*720
English 2.0
R
23.976 fps
85 min
P/S N/A / N/A
1.57 GB
1920×1080
English 2.0
R
23.976 fps
85 min
P/S N/A / N/A

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by anthonyjlangford 8 / 10 / 10

Stuck in the Middle with Gordon...

Stuart Gordon made a masterpiece in Re-animator, and carved a career in the eighties out of schlock horror with a heavy foot in satire. In the nineties he managed to lose his way a little but the naughties has seen him experimenting with genres, providing his most interesting work to date. Edmond was a lurch to the left with Mamet's difficult play, but this film returns him to a genre he's more familiar with, yet the tone is firmly planted in reality. Some reviewers have suggested that Stuck is simply a thriller but I disagree. Certainly there is a grotesque sort of suspense, yet Gordon has managed to provide humanity to his victim, and show us the type of system that puts so many to the street. It also shows us how a relatively normal reaction of fear and shock can mislead even the most well meaning person into a situation which climbs out of control with devastating consequences. It will also reinforce the fact that we never know how people will react until placed into a difficult situation, ourselves included. The film never feels forced. You can believe that this actually happened, (based loosely on a true story) though this takes events to the extreme. Stephen Rea gives a constrained performance, (pun intended) as the proverbial bug. You'll feel his pain and scream for justice. I hope Stuart Gordon continues taking risks. His best work may be ahead of him.

Reviewed by loosewigg 9 / 10 / 10

The Turning Point

When does an ordinary person become monstrous; what is the trigger; when is the fatal turning point? Is fear an acceptable reason for selfishness, brutality and a headlong flight from responsibility? Gordon deals admirably with this dilemma using a crafty balance of horror and humor in a bloody film about a hit & run driver who becomes inhuman while the victim remains human and humane through relentless pain, shock, & bad luck. Both Stephen Rea and Mena Suvari offer up fine performances as a middle class guy down on his luck and a hard working and hard playing young woman in a tough and demanding job.

Reviewed by Art Snob 9 / 10 / 10

The best B-movie since BOUND

9/16/2008 Addendum: IMPORTANT! This review applies ONLY to the 94-minute FESTIVAL cut of this film. I see that the DVD version is only 85 minutes ... do NOT buy or rent it based on this review. * * * * It's movies like this one that will keep me going to the 'Midnight Madness' program of the Toronto Film Festival forever. I saw it at last year's, and have been looking forward to a repeat viewing ever since. I love it when a low-budget film can soar above the corporate mega-movies on a clever script and a cast that gives it 110%, and this is definitely one of those movies. It gave me everything I could want in such a film – sex, drugs, and violence, with some jet-black humor for dessert. (Note to PG-13ers: AVOID!) It probably won't make a big splash when it's released theatrically, but I'd put money on it achieving cult status after coming out on video. This is easily the best work that director Stuart Gordon has done since REANIMATOR – I'd go so far as to say that it's his best ever. It's a suspense-horror-comedy full of situations that make you laugh and groan at the same time … one that's also refreshingly NOT top-heavy with f/x. The Midnight Madness program has a firm policy that a film has to grab your attention within the first 15 minutes in order to qualify for inclusion, and this film meets that requirement with room to spare. What's more, it never drags for a minute. The story is based on the bizarre true life tale of a woman who hit a homeless man with her car and let him slowly bleed to death while stuck in her windshield. Gordon calls this "the way the story should have turned out." The homeless man in this case is played by the reliable Steven Rea, whose sad eyes give him a head start on eliciting sympathy. He's newly homeless, and his fall to the bottom is cleverly punctuated by him repeatedly hearing a timeworn cliché uttered by a succession of unsympathetic characters. The woman is played by American BEAUTY's Mena Survari, and this is her richest role since that one. She finally gets to play a character who actually evolves over the course of a film, instead of just doing 9-5 duty in another eye candy role. I can't overemphasize how impressive the bang for the buck that Gordon gets with this film is. He also makes an amusing Hitchcock-style cameo (one that I'll bet Hitch himself wouldn't have minded making). There was genuinely enthusiastic applause at the screening I went to when the movie ended and the cast (except for Rea) came on for a lively Q & A. If movies lately seem a bit too tame for you, this is very likely just what the doctor ordered.

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