The Divorcee

1930

Drama / Romance

190
IMDb Rating 6.7 10 2,596

Synopsis


Downloaded times
September 11, 2020

Cast

Norma Shearer as Jerry
720p.WEB 1080p.WEB
753.03 MB
1280*720
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
84 min
P/S N/A / N/A
1.37 GB
1920×1080
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
84 min
P/S N/A / N/A

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by gftbiloxi 8 / 10 / 10

A Neglected Landmark, More Often Discussed Than Actually Seen

THE Divorcée was created in the first wave of "all talking pictures," an era in which directors, writers, and actors often struggled to find styles appropriate to the new technology. At the time, it was hailed as a masterpiece of realism; today, however, it is a film more often discussed than actually seen, for there is no escaping the fact that the film is stylistically dated. Even so, it remains a landmark of its era--and given its historical importance it should be seen by any one with a serious interest in the history of American cinema. The film is "pre-code," which is to say that it was made during a handful of years in the early 1930s when Hollywood's self-censorship was more the subject of jokes than of reality, and THE Divorcée was among the first Hollywood talkies to openly address both female sexuality and the sexual double standard. The story finds Jerry (Norma Shearer) and Ted (Chester Morris) happily married--but on their third anniversary Jerry discovers that Ted has been unfaithful, something that Ted dismisses with the words "it doesn't mean a thing." Angry and hurt, Jerry responds by having a one night stand of her own--and then is astonished by Ted's hypocrisy when he declares that her infidelity "isn't the same thing." The same story has been told so often that today we take it for granted, but in 1930 it was extremely controversial, and the cast plays it out with considerable intensity. Most notable is star Norma Shearer; although changing styles have left her sadly neglected, in her own era she was considered among the finest actresses on the screen and noted for her unusual beauty, memorable speaking voice, and tremendous star quality. In THE Divorcée she gives it everything she has, and her power is such that most viewers will find she quickly transcends the stylistically dated aspects of both the film and her own performance. Over the years I've seen the film several times--most impressively on the big screen, where the larger than life performances seem considerably less affected--and I've enjoyed it quite a bit every time. If you are interested in exploring early 1930s Hollywood films, you could do considerably worse than to begin with THE Divorcée, which was my own introduction to that film era. If you are already interested in early 1930s film and have never seen it... this one belongs on your shelf, and no excuses. Gary F. Taylor, aka GFT

Reviewed by secondtake 8 / 10 / 10

Fast, advanced sound and naturalistic acting, and modern themes...terrific!

The Divorcée (1930) The start of this is such a busy, overlapping party scene in a country house, you can't help but get swept up in it. And if some of the acting or a few of the quips are not perfect, the best moments are really fun and spirited. The naturalism is really refreshing, and pace fast, and the dialog real. Then it spins out of control--the events, not the movie--and before fifteen minutes are up, there's a brief terrible moment that has two or three of the actors exploring an hysteria that a method actor would be proud of. It's intense, great stuff. Get at least that far in. The rest of the movie follows suit, through quiet and fast moments, and the drama turns to melodrama and back, all pinned together by the ever convincing Norma Shearer. The themes--fidelity and infidelity, love and friendship, the superficial versus the things that matter--give it all something to chew on or laugh at at ever turn. It's unnecessary to say that this is just two years after the full advent of sound, and it's a very developed, mature element in the movies. In fact, the density of things going on would never have been possible with intertitles, and it must have been a revelation to audiences and movie makers equally. Fast dialog and overlapping events are a natural extension of the theater, of course, but with the ability to shift scenes and zip down wooded roads with the camera is the essence of cinema. So, in all, for how it's made, for the acting (the best of it), and for the serious, important themes, this is gem, an amazing movie, whatever its hiccups and flaws here and there. I wouldn't miss it.

Reviewed by emdragon 8 / 10 / 10

Norma Shearer gives one of the all-time great performances

The Divorcée, set in 1930 New York, profiles a pair of party-making revelers amidst an entire circle of friends in high society. . .before and after they dare to turn their lives over to the institution of marriage, which in this world of around the clock carousing is a far cry from what is expected of them by their partying circle of friends. Norma Shearer, in what truly is one of the silver screen's great performances, plays the creatively witty and sweetly charming high society gal Jerry Martin. She can have any man in the group, but chooses Ted. They are married, and enter into an enduring period of romantic fairytale bliss (3 Years). Then, on the eve of their 3rd wedding anniversary everything unravels in a sea of infidelity, bitter honesty, and emotion. Norma Shearer's performance completely enraptures, and in an honest portrayal of ensuing emotional fallout, we see the inner struggles of the modern enlightened woman of her time. Robert Mongomery, in a supporting role, shines as well as the veritable proprietor of the circle of friends and one of the reveling agents of promiscuous redress. The film's direction is interesting, the makeup slightly absurd (it is 1930), and the cinematography non-existent. . .yet Ms Shearer's riveting abilities entrance the audience, and more than carry the day.

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