The Good Fairy

1951

Drama

167
IMDb Rating 6.5 10 51

Synopsis


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November 27, 2020

Cast

720p.WEB 1080p.WEB
998.46 MB
1280*720
Japanese 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
108 min
P/S N/A / N/A
1.81 GB
1920×1080
Japanese 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
108 min
P/S N/A / N/A

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by boblipton 10 / 10 / 10

The Parts Not Left Out

Chikage Awashima leaves her husband, Koreya Sendai. Because he is a high-ranking official and a socially important man, this is potential news for the gutter press. Reporter Rentarô Mikuni is assigned to the story. Sendai refuses to comment, but Mikuni tracks down the lady's sister, Yôko Katsuragi, who is living with her father, Chishû Ryû. He is a lapsed Buddist priest, who has given up on faith and man and now lives in a cabin in the snowy mountains. Miss Katsuragi leads Mikuni to her sister, but she likewise refuses to say anything printworthy. Mikuni returns to the city and confers with his editor, Masayuki Mori. He knew Miss Awashima ten years earlier as a friend. Actually, he had loved her, but never said anything definite. Now, with this situation, he sees an opportunity. Meanwhile, Mikuni digs into leads and realizes he loves Miss Katsuragi and wants to marry her, even though she is dying. There are times when, looking at some Japanese movies, I am convinced that plot drives character, rather than the other way; either that, or the Japanese are so very alien that I cannot understand them at all. Perhaps that is because the Japanese audience knows the first part of the story, and doesn't need to recapitulate it. They are content to get to the good parts, like grandmother smashing her own teeth so she can commit suicide, or a couple who stay married so they may torment each other. The Japanese know what came before, so the tale can begin in medias res, with Hansel and Gretel devouring a gingerbread cottage, or Cinderella's stepsisters cutting off their toes. If you don't understand the situation, you're utterly confused, while the intended audience can say "Ah! I've seen this before! This is the good part!" and be happy to haven't wasted any time on the boring stuff that everyone knows anyway. Keisuke Kinoshita's movie is about many things. It is about corruption and the line between private and public life, the horrid state of Japanese laws about marriage, the conviction that saving face is more important than what you really do, and about the arousal of love that turns into obsession and makes you do things that look absolutely insane if you came into the movie half an hour late: as if the plot were driving the characters instead of the other way around. That would be my reaction. The Japanese audience of the time would have probably nodded their heads and whispered "This is the good part!" Fortunately, I watched this from the beginning, and nod my head in pleasure at a story that makes its own, weird sense.

Reviewed by pscamp01 / 10

A Not Particularly Interesting Look At journalism and Marriage

The Good Fairy is an early 1950's Japanese movie that looks at journalism and marriage. The plot is about a young reporter who is assigned by his editor the story of a wife who has left her government official husband. This assignment ends up changing both of their lives significantly. As a social document, the movie does have some interest as it makes points about idealism and how the Japanese divorce laws at the time were totally skewed against the wife. But the movie does not work that well as a drama. The story itself is not particularly compelling and the two male lead characters are not very likable. The movie does have a very bizarre ending, which does add interest in a macabre way, but overall there is little reason to seek this movie out.

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