The Protector

1985

Action / Crime / Thriller

119
IMDb Rating 5.7 10 3,620

Synopsis


Downloaded times
December 8, 2019

Cast

Danny Aiello as Horse
Jackie Chan as Insp. Chan Ka Kui
John Spencer as Ko's Pilot
Mike Starr as Lorenzo Galante
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
855.75 MB
1280*720
English
NR
23.976 fps
91 min
P/S N/A / N/A
1.5 GB
1920×1080
English
NR
23.976 fps
91 min
P/S N/A / N/A

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by lost-in-limbo 5 / 10 / 10

Can do much better.

After constantly reading and hearing nothing but negative opinions about the American produced, but also filmed in Hong Kong Jackie Chan vehicle 'The Protector'. It didn't sway me from checking it out. I'm no Jackie Chan fan, but honestly it was director James Glickenhaus' name which fed my interest. Best known for the 80s exploitative vigilante flick 'The Exterminator (1980)' and some entertaining action joints 'The Soldier (1982)' and 'Shakedown (1985). 'The Protector' does have the same vibe of his early efforts; gritty, brutal, rough and seamy. And I would call it lesser work. However the main talking point will always be how Glickenhaus used Jackie Chan. Yes, Chan is wasted in a role that would've been better suited for someone else (Norris comes to mind, as it has more in common with his stuff), as his martial arts abilities and amusing characteristics are never truly capitalized on. I'm so use to seeing him with that *wink, wink* attitude (Project A) and piling on those extravagantly energy-packed stunt work (Police Story). It's a different kettle, and very atypical. Here he looks uncomfortable throughout with that hardboiled edge. Just listen to his sober delivery of the dialogues. That endearing personality is kept in check. This performance seemed to ask more on dramatic acting, than his psychical and lively talent. He's pairing up with Danny Aiello (a loutish cop) couldn't be anymore disjointed and unbelievable. The chemistry never felt right, but with these problems I still was mesmerized. The rest of the performances (Bill Wallace, Roy Chiao) were indifferent. Look out for a short appearance by Mike Starr. While it didn't have the on-going rush I was expecting, Chan gets some furious and hard-hitting action sequences (like the opening slow-motion bloody shoot-out, tricky boat chase (one by water and the other by foot) and a marvellous sky-high balancing act). The film doesn't start off too badly, but when it hits Honk Kong. The copy and paste formula with its many predictable outcomes (involving the seedy crime underworld and the buddy style of two rogue cops) seems to plod along rather coldly. At least there's something enticing about the moody Hong Kong scenery, and ace cinematographer Mark Irwin's crisp moving camera-work is expansively fleshed-out. Effectively detailing the backdrop. Glickenhaus' direction is scratchy, but he knows how to set-up street style locations and infuse sleaze (especially the opportunities that arose to squeeze in nudity). It cops a lot shtick, but without the expectations it's a passable odd of sorts.

Reviewed by Hey_Sweden 7 / 10 / 10

Not as bad as its reputation would suggest.

In the second attempt to introduce martial arts superstar Jackie Chan to the North American market (after "The Big Brawl" in 1980), ever likable Jackie is amusingly miscast as Billy Wong, an NYC cop who, after some hot dog heroics, is demoted to crowd control at a fashion show, where he's partnered with Danny Garoni (the engaging Danny Aiello). Unfortunately, they prove to be pretty useless and Laura Shapiro (Saun Ellis), daughter of a wealthy big shot, is kidnapped by goons working for dastardly Hong Kong mobster Mr. Ko (Roy Chiao). Billy and Danny manage to convince their commissioner to let them travel to HK to advise and assist local authorities in defeating Ko and rescuing Laura, but of course these two mavericks are pretty much just going to do whatever they want to do. There are *some* fine moments here for Chan fans, but there simply may not be enough. The tone *is* rather gritty, but although there's not a lot of outright comedy, the movie does still have a sense of humour. Chan has some fine action and fight sequences, especially one around the halfway point where he's trying to pursue a henchman escaping by boat. The stunts near the end are impressively scary. Writer / director James Glickenhaus ("The Exterminator") does a very fine job in utilizing the various HK locations. Jackie does his best in the lead, with Aiello offering fine support and Chiao being just right as our glowering bad guy. Jackie does have a decent if not spectacular climactic fight with fellow martial artist Bill Wallace. All things considered, it's not hard to see why Chan himself and some of his fan base might not care for the movie, but there is an alternate cut now available on Blu-ray with additional scenes created by Jackie himself, to better suit his vision (he really had no control on this feature at the time). In any event, it's worth noting the presence of a couple of familiar faces among the supporting cast, including Becky Ann Baker, John Spencer, Mike Starr, Big John Studd, and Trey Wilson. It would take another 11 years before North America finally, really took notice of Jackie with the release of "Rumble in the Bronx". Six out of 10.

Reviewed by magilvilla 7 / 10 / 10

Gets A Bad Rap.

This movie is a lot better than people say it is. Sure, it's not a typical Jackie Chan movie, but it's good anyway. It has lots of action and is better than most of the buddy cop movies of the 1980's. Don't expect this to be like all of his other movies and you may like it. I did.

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