The Pursuit of Happiness

1971

Crime / Drama

44
IMDb Rating 6.1 10 293

Synopsis


Downloaded times
March 21, 2020

Cast

Barbara Hershey as Myra Fleener
Charles Durning as Nicholas XX
William Devane as The Lawyer
720p.WEB 1080p.WEB
854.4 MB
1280*720
English 2.0
PG-13
23.976 fps
93 min
P/S N/A / N/A
1.55 GB
1920×1080
English 2.0
PG-13
23.976 fps
93 min
P/S N/A / N/A

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by moonspinner55 6 / 10 / 10

"I'm so young....I'm so young."

Uninvolved New York college student, estranged from his wealthy family and half-heartedly romancing his radical girlfriend, realizes just how empty and directionless his life has become after he accidentally strikes a jaywalker with his car and is sentenced to a year in jail for vehicular manslaughter. Intensely troubling material, based on the book by Thomas Rogers, given low-keyed, matter-of-fact treatment. Michael Sarrazin's dazed and confused young man doesn't mean to buck the system (i.e., the Establishment), necessarily--he refuses to play by the rules because, as he sees it, you have to lie to win. Not wanting to be dishonest to himself, he manages to get in much deeper trouble. Not a surefire crowd-pleaser (especially for this generation), the film is intelligent and smoothly handled, if unable to explore its themes adequately within this milieu. It doesn't want to be a cop-out and have the protagonist become "a better man" by being a model prisoner--and at the same time, it doesn't want to be explosive or dynamic and have the kid get away guilt-free. There's no happy ending (hence the irony of the title), but certainly the circumstances which arise here are thought-provoking. Sarrazin and young, lovely Barbara Hershey are very good; Arthur Hill also excellent as Sarrazin's surprisingly understanding father. The supporting cast is wonderfully filled with now-familiar faces: Sada Thompson, Ralph Waite, David Doyle, Robert Klein, William Devane, Rue McClanahan, Charles Durning. A forgotten picture worth-seeing...and worth discussing afterward. **1/2 from ****

Reviewed by Shilpot7 8 / 10 / 10

Better than you'd probably expect

A lot of the films about disaffected youth in America produced at the end of the 60s and the beginning of the 70s were very clichéd and cheaply made by people who really didn't know anything about the subject. They were often clumsily and quickly made to cash in on the period's 'youthquake'. This is not entirely the case here, though it does have its clumsy clichéd moments. By and large, this film was sensitively executed, about a Columbia student, from an old and wealthy New York family, who accidentally knocks down and kills a woman with his car on a very rainy night and where the tragedy leads him. Michael Sarrazin is good to look at, as his girlfriend played by Barbara Hershey and he turns in an honest and tender performance. The plot is quite thin but the sensitivity and reasonable depth of many of the various performances, notably by his gentle father (Arthur Hill) and bigoted grandmother (Ruth White), give it substance. It's definitely worth watching.

Reviewed by Sylviastel 8 / 10 / 10

Ruth White's Final Performance!

This film should be dedicated to the memory of beloved film, stage and television actress, Ruth White. She did in 1969 and this was her final screen performance. She was only 55 years old at the time of her death. She is too young to play Grandmother Popper. White played older female roles in other works. Ruth White is great here as the prejudicial wealthy WASPy grandmother in New York City. Her grandson is played well by Michael Sarrazin who accidentally kills an elderly woman in a car accident. There are plenty of familiar faces like David Doyle; Robert Klein; a young Barbara Hershey; Arthur Hill; Rue McClanahan; Barnard Hughes; and Charles Durning. They filmed on location in New York City. The writing and acting are fine. For the most part, it isn't a bad film but it is no long forgotten.

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