The Rapture

1991

Drama / Mystery

110
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 67%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 62%
IMDb Rating 6.2 10 4,899

Synopsis


Downloaded times
January 28, 2021

Director

Cast

David Duchovny as Randy
Mimi Rogers as Hadley Elgin
Will Patton as Adam
720p.WEB 1080p.WEB
917.73 MB
1280*720
English 2.0
R
23.976 fps
100 min
P/S N/A / N/A
1.67 GB
1920×1080
English 2.0
R
23.976 fps
100 min
P/S N/A / N/A

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by kbnewton 8 / 10 / 10

Complicated and uncompromising -- possibly Mimi Rogers' finest performance.

A haunting movie -- one that lingers in the mind (and the heart) for a long time afterwards. Mimi Rogers turns in a stunning performance as a woman trapped in a cycle of dull work and duller play, whose life is transformed twice -- first by a religious conversion, and then by coming face to face with the literal meaning of that conversion. She is incandescent in her belief, and in the movie's final scenes, takes on the epic proportions of a Job or King Lear. You may be puzzled, conflicted, or even offended by what the movie "means," but you won't be able to walk away from it untouched.

Reviewed by mombasa_pete 9 / 10 / 10

You people need to understand this film better.

The final scenes which show the end of the world and the apocalypse and the passing of all the biblical prophecies (the four horsemen, the trumpets etc) are NOT hallucinatory. They are supposed to be real not inside the main character's head. Look at the way they are depicted, she is in a police station, and the people around her react to these things, another woman prisoner begins singing "hark the herald angel", the bars fall magically off the cell doors, the TV that is on starts showing the 4 horsemen and angelic figures, and we hear the sound of the trumpet and see everyone: the sheriffs, the prisoners reacting to this. The point of the film is this: that religious fanaticism may be frightening. But what would be EVEN MORE frightening: what if the religious zealots depicted in the film, what if they turned out not to be misguided or wrong in their beliefs but to be RIGHT: that the Book of Revelations actually WILL come true! This is what makes the film so terrifying. The very final scene where the 2 remaining characters, Will Patton and Mimi Rogers are in Heaven, shows that in the end even though the world has ended and the coming of the Apocalypse has passed, and the Second Reign of Heaven has come, that in the end, the Mimi Rogers character finally realizes that in spite of her previous choices, that she decides human free will and the right to question, to choose (i.e. free speech) must be paramount, EVEN if this means she is condemned to purgatory forever. So she chooses NOT to embrace God, this is why Will Patton suddenly vanishes, he chooses to and goes to Heaven, but she allows her earlier doubts, about how God can allow evil and suffering, to prevent her from accepting God as the Saviour. She accepts He exists, but will not follow Him. So THIS is the film's ultimate message: that human freewill may triumph even against the strongest powers. I know this may be hard to accept, but it does not make the film anti-Christian but thought provoking. I am Catholic and was not offended by the film at all, as it raises important issues. What is sad is that it is clear from previous comments on this site is that it went straight over many people's heads. Read more, attend more University courses, is my advice.

Reviewed by kinglet 9 / 10 / 10

The pride of perfect conviction

Several of the cast members of this movie have noted that the budget pretty much ran out near the end. Fortunately by then you are so fascinated to find out how it will all end the shortcuts are easy to ignore. This is one you remember. There's a certain type of convert - to religion, politics, you name it - who is so sure of him or herself they just can't ever stop and question whether they've substituted an arrogant certainty where faith and humility should reside. Seldom is this zealotry depicted in film, and if it is usually some secondary character wears the label, all the better to comment on or contrast with the actions of the main characters. Here that character is front and center. The sin of pride born of absolute certainty is Mimi Rogers real co-star. Rogers is so effective here because her zealotry is low-key. She is soft spoken and serene, a lovely woman. Only gradually do we see how deep rooted is her need to understand God in her own way and how convinced she is that she's doing it absolutely the right way. Movies never, ever take a certain type of religious conversion all the way to such a logical conclusion. For me, that's what makes this movie such a stunner. I've always been sorry this film never got it's due in the theatrical release, but the subject matter, coming after an opening act glimpse of Rogers' empty sexual adventuring, probably made it a double whammy for timid theater owners. If it were released next week somehow I don't think it would be nearly as ignored as it was. I only made an effort to see it because Roger Ebert paid it some special attention in his review, and I'm glad I did. This movie needs a DVD release, because it definitely is an overlooked and memorable film that should prompt many a conversation about worthwhile matters of the spirit. As I write this there is a certain amount of criticism of Clint Eastwood's "Million Dollar Baby" coming from various corners, including one film critic who claims that Hollywood dislikes religion. "The Rapture" seems to me a perfect example of a movie designed to start useful discussions about what it means to be outwardly "religious" in an "us vs. them" mindset rather than truly, inclusively spiritual. I don't recall any public commentary about this movie when it came out at all, yet I'd say it is far more the provocative of the two.

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